The Fox Third Reader

Front Cover
G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1919 - 211 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 74 - Gumee, By the shining Big-Sea-Water, Stood the wigwam of Nokomis, Daughter of the Moon, Nokomis. Dark behind it rose the forest, Rose the black and gloomy pine-trees, Rose the firs with cones upon them ; Bright before it beat the water, Beat the clear and sunny water, Beat the shining Big-Sea-Water.
Page 78 - Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How they built their nests in Summer, Where they hid themselves in Winter, Talked with them whene'er he met them, Called them "Hiawatha's Chickens." Of all beasts he learned the language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How the beavers built their lodges, Where the squirrels hid their acorns, How the reindeer ran so swiftly, Why the rabbit was so timid, Talked with them whene'er he met...
Page 76 - said the pine-trees, " Mudway-aushka ! " said the water. Saw the fire-fly, Wah-wah-taysee, Flitting through the dusk of evening, With the twinkle of its candle Lighting up the brakes and bushes, And he sang the song of children, Sang the song Nokomis taught him...
Page 77 - And the good Nokomis answered : " Once a warrior, very angry, Seized his grandmother, and threw her Up into the sky at midnight ; Right against the moon he threw her ; "Pis her body that you see there." Saw the rainbow in the heaven, In the eastern sky, the rainbow, Whispered, "What is that, Nokomis?
Page 75 - Flaring far away to northward In the frosty nights of Winter; Showed the broad white road in heaven, Pathway of the ghosts, the shadows, Running straight across the heavens, Crowded with the ghosts, the shadows. At the door on summer evenings Sat the little Hiawatha; Heard the whispering of the pine-trees, Heard the lapping of the water, Sounds of music, words of wonder; "Minne-wawa!
Page 138 - I wonder if he knew How sad the bird would feel ? " A little boy hung down his head, And went and hid behind the bed ; For he stole that pretty nest From poor little yellow-breast ; And he felt so full of shame, He didn't like to tell his name.
Page 77 - And the good Nokomis answered : " 'Tis the heaven of flowers you see there ; All the wild flowers of the forest, All the lilies of the prairie, When on earth they fade and perish, Blossom in that heaven above us.
Page 137 - Don't ask me again. Why, I haven'ta chick Would do such a trick. We all gave her a feather, And she wove them together. I'd scorn to intrude On her and her brood. Cluck! Cluck!" said the hen, "Don't ask me again." "Chirr-a-whirr! Chirr-a-whirr! All the birds make a stir! Let us find out his name, And all cry, 'For shame!'" "I would not rob a bird," Said little Mary Green; "I think I never heard Of anything so mean.
Page 135 - To-whit! To-whit! To-whee! Will you listen to me ? Who stole four eggs I laid, And the nice nes,t I made?
Page 75 - Hush! the Naked Bear will hear thee!" Lulled him into slumber, singing, "Ewa-yea! my little owlet! Who is this, that lights the wigwam? With his great eyes lights the wigwam? Ewa-yea! my little owlet!" Many things Nokomis taught him Of the stars that shine in heaven; Showed him Ishkoodah, the comet, Ishkoodah, with fiery tresses; Showed the Death-Dance of the spirits, Warriors with their plumes and war-clubs, Flaring far away to northward In the frosty nights of Winter; Showed the broad white road...

Bibliographic information