New Composition and Rhetoric for Schools

Front Cover
Scott, Foresman, 1911 - 508 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Subjects Taken from Our Studies
35
Subjects Drawn from Our Reading
36
The Four Kinds of Composition
38
Description
39
The Writers Interest in His Subject Fundamental
40
CHAPTER IV
47
Questions of Size and Definiteness
48
Titles
49
Summary of Chapters III and IV
51
CHAPTER V
59
Development of a Narrative Subject
60
Development of a Descriptive Subject
63
Beginnings and Endings
67
The Use of Details
70
The Use of Dialogue
71
CHAPTER VI
85
Outline and Structure in Expository Compositions
91
Beginnings and Endings
93
Suiting the Style to the Substance
96
Summary of the Main Points of Chapter V and VI
97
CHAPTER VII
106
ParagraphTopics
108
Length of Paragraphs
112
Relation of the Paragraph to the Headings of the Outline
113
The Paragraph in Dialogue and Quotation
114
CHAPTER VIII
129
Legitimate Omissions of Subject or Predicate
130
Clauses Defined
132
Independent Clauses
133
Improper Use of Phrases and Clauses
134
Simple Complex and Compound Sentences Defined
135
Simple Compound and Complex Sentences Contrasted
137
CHAPTER IX
145
Nouns
146
Pronouns
148
Hanging Participles
149
Mistakes in Tense
150
Adjectives and Adverbs
151
Lack of Agreement in Number
152
Pronoun and Antecedent
153
False Correlations of the Double Conjunctions
154
Mixed Constructions
155
Double Subject and Object
156
CHAPTER X
168
How to Learn Punctuation
169
The Period
170
The Colon
171
The Comma
173
The Dash
178
SECTION PAGB 60 The Apostrophe
179
Capitals i
180
Italics
181
The Punctuation of Dialogue
182
CHAPTER XI
200
Business Letters
201
Formal Letters in the First Person
206
Formal Letters in the Third Person
207
Informal Letters
209
Cautions
211
USAGE CHAPTER XII
221
The History of the Language
222
Standard Modern English Determined by Good Use
225
Good Use a Relative Term a
227
The Use of the Dictionary
228
CHAPTER XIII
231
National Use
232
Technical Words
233
Foreign Words
235
Americanisms and Anglicisms
236
Reputable Use
238
How to Get a Reputable Vocabulary
241
CHAPTER XIV
246
Slang
247
Newspaper English
250
CHAPTER XV
255
Verbs
256
Nouns
258
The Literary Use of Special Vocabularies
288
Enlargement of the Vocabulary by the Use of New Words
290
CHAPTER XVIII
298
Accuracy of Phrase
299
Euphemism
300
Newspaper Diction
301
Sentimental Phrasing
302
SECTION PAGE 105 Appropriateness
303
The Suggestive Power of Words
307
The Effect of Triteness
308
Specific and Concrete Words vs General
311
Abstract Words
312
The Faults of Figurative Diction
313
Summary of Chapter
314
PART FOUR STRUCTURAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING THE SENTENCE THE PARAGRAPH AND THE WHOLE COMPOSITION CHAPTER XI...
325
Unity in Single Sentences
327
The Relation of the Sentence to the Paragraph
330
Summary of Chapter
331
CHAPTER XX
334
COHERENCE IN SENTENCES 112 Coherence Defined
335
Ambiguous Pronouns
336
Ambiguous Participles and Verbal Nouns in ing
339
Lack of Parallelism in Construction and Phrasing
340
Grammatical Devices for Showing the Relation of the Parts of a Sentence a
343
Summary of Chapter
344
CHAPTER XXI
349
Illustrative SentenceForms
350
Variation in Sentence Length
354
Loose and Periodic Sentences
356
SECTION PAGE 122 Emphasis in Sentences
359
Summary of Chapter
361
CHAPTER XXII
367
Unity in the Paragraph
369
Coherence in the Paragraph
374
Incoherence from Omission of Connectives
375
Devices for Bringing out the Coherence in a Paragraph
378
Proportion in Paragraphs
379
Emphasis in Paragraphs
380
Summary of Chapter
383
CHAPTER XXIII
393
Selection for Unity
396
Selection for Proportion
398
Coherence in the Whole Composition
400
Incoherence in Structure
401
The Effect of Paragraphing on Coherence
403
The Usefulness of Connectives
404
Emphasis in the Whole Composition
406
Beginnings and Endings
407
PART FIVE KINDS OF COMPOSITION CHAPTER XXIV
427
The Strength and the Weakness of Description in Words
429
Selection and Coherence in Description
430
The Point of View in Description
432
CHAPTER XXV
441
Setting
442
Action or Plot
443
Motion in Narration
444
Climax in Narration
447
The Point of View in Narration
448
Short Stories
450
CHAPTER XXVI
458
Structure in Exposition
462
Diction in Exposition
464
The Use of Reference Books
465
Giving Credit for Borrowed Material
466
CHAPTER XXVII
473
The Nature of Proof
474
Organization
476
The Brief
477
The Relation of the Brief to the Written Argument
482
Figures of Speech APPENDIX A I Figures of Speech Defined
493
Metaphor and Simile
494
Personification
495
SentenceForms Classified as Figures
496
Qualities of Style Classified as Figures
497
APPENDIX C
498
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 238 - And only the Master shall praise us. and only the Master shall blame: And no one shall work for money. and no one shall work for fame. But each for the joy of the working. and each. in his separate star. Shall draw the Thing as he sees It for the God of Things as They Are!
Page 76 - Good speed!" cried the watch as the gate-bolts undrew, "Speed!" echoed the wall to us galloping through. Behind shut the postern, the lights sank to rest, And into the midnight we galloped abreast.
Page 386 - Come on, sir; here's the place: stand still. How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs that wing the midway air Show scarce so gross as beetles: halfway down Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade! Methinks he seems no bigger than his head...
Page 171 - And ere three shrill notes the pipe uttered, You heard as if an army muttered; And the muttering grew to a grumbling; And the grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling; And out of the houses the rats came tumbling. Great rats, small rats, lean rats, brawny rats, Brown rats, black rats, gray rats, tawny rats, Grave old plodders, gay young friskers, Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins, Cocking tails and pricking whiskers, Families by tens and dozens, Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives, — Followed the Piper...
Page 18 - It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work that they have thus far so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us; that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last, full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that...
Page 31 - Tu-whit, tu-who - a merry note, While greasy Joan doth keel the pot. When all aloud the wind doth blow, And coughing drowns the parson's saw, And birds sit brooding in the snow, And Marian's nose looks red and raw, When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl, Then nightly sings the staring owl...
Page 23 - You know, we French stormed Ratisbon : A mile or so away On a little mound, Napoleon Stood on our storming-day ; With neck out-thrust, you fancy how, Legs wide, arms locked behind, As if to balance the prone brow Oppressive with its mind. ii Just as perhaps he mused " My plans " That soar, to earth may fall, " Let once my army-leader Lannes
Page 127 - I was aware, however, that his very ancient family had been noted, time out of mind, for a peculiar sensibility of temperament, displaying itself, through long ages, in many works of exalted art, and manifested of late in repeated deeds of munificent yet unobtrusive charity, as well as in a passionate devotion to the intricacies, perhaps even more than to the orthodox and easily recognizable beauties, of musical science.
Page 267 - I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appear to me to be sufficient reasons, and yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be a brave and skillful soldier, which, of course, I like.
Page 171 - To Rat-land home his commentary: Which was: "At the first shrill notes of the pipe, I heard a sound as of scraping tripe, And putting apples, wondrous ripe, Into a cider press's gripe; And a moving away of pickle-tub-boards, And a leaving ajar of conserve-cupboards, And a drawing the corks of train-oil-flasks, And a breaking the hoops of butter-casks: And it seemed as if a voice (Sweeter far than by harp or by psaltery Is breathed) called out, 'Oh, rats, rejoice!

Bibliographic information