Page images
PDF
EPUB

licly and as a fugitive. There were not waiting-rooms were full of people, I took inany persons present to record the circum- refuge in the station-master's office, where stances of that passage into exile, but some there were already a few persons, and there were; and a private letter, too re- amongst others, the Marchioness of Javalplete with graphic and characteristic details quinto, the Countess of Cartagena, the not to have proceeded from an eye-witness, Spanish Consul and his family, and some found its way into a French journal,* and French people. Lucky were we to have may appropriately be introduced here :- chosen that place,

for a few moments later, BIARRITZ, Sept. 30, 1868.- After one by order of the Empress, the station was hundred and sixty-eight years that have cleared and everybody was turned into the elapsed since the adoption of Philip Duke outer court; the office in which we were of Anjou by Charles II., to-day, the 30 Sep- was alone exempted from this measure. tember, 1868, at two o'clock in the afternoon, “It is one o'clock. The Queen is at the the Bourbon dynasty of Spain died before station of St. Jean de Luz. The Emperor my eyes, at the Biarritz railway station, in and Empress arrive at the Biarritz station. the arms of the Emperor. An ocular wit- The Empress comes to speak with the Marness, with some very few privileged persons, chioness of Javalquinto; the Emperor walks of that fatal interview, I think to give you alone upon the platform, with head bent pleasure by relating its circumstantial and and plunged in thought. Suddenly he orexact details.

ders a despatch to be sent to the Queen to " It was towards eight o'clock this morn- ask her if she proposes going straight to ing that the Queen, in spite of the advice Pau or to pause at Biarritz. The question, of those around her, decided upon flight, by its form, may be said to have dictated and gave her orders in consequence. Ron- the reply, which was not long in coming : call, Minister of State, prevailed over those the Queen answers that she is going straight who, in the council of the Queen, still ad- to Pau. vocated resistance.

“ The departure from St. Jean de Luz is “A despatch addressed to M. Mon, the signalled, and soon afterwards the special Spanish Ambassador at the Court of France, train entered the Biarritz station. The Queen and received at half-past eight at Biarritz, was alone on the balcony of the saloon cargave intelligence of the catastrophe. Im- riage, the King at the door of the saloon; mediately Señor Mon set out for Hendaye Marfori stood behind the Queen, pompous, (the frontier station), accompanied by Gen- and wearing over his black coat the broad eral de Castelnau, the Emperor's aide-de- ribbon of the Order of Charles III. At camp, to meet the Queen. I will not tell the moment when the Emperor advanced to you all the hesitations, all the resolutions, offer his hand to the Queen, the express all the orders and counter-orders, that train from Paris to Spain, which had been filled up the morning, and of which the rail- waiting the arrival of the other to proceed way telegraph wire between Biarritz and on its journey, came up, and from it were llendave

was the bearer; it would be weari- heard to proceed cries inost insulting to the some and useless now that the thing is over. Queen - a loud clamour -in which was During that time the Spanish Consul at Bay- especially distinguishable the word Fuera ! onne took measures to secure at Pau the ne-|(get out, or out with her). cessary lodgings for the Queen and all her At these cries the Emperor made a suite.

backward movement, and tears gushed from “ The rumour of all these proceedings the eyes of the Queen, who got out, as well soon spread at Biarritz, and every obtaina- as the King and her children, the high perble carriage was hired by the curious, eager sonages of her suite, Father Claret and the to get to the station, which is about three inevitable Marfori. kilometres from the centre of the town. “ After having shaken hands with the

“ The most accredited version — I will Emperor and kissed the Empress, they all say more, the truest — was that the Queen four — the Emperor, the Empress, the wonld enter Biarritz and pay a visit at the Queen, and the King - entered the firstimperial villa. It was thought she came to class waiting room, of which the doors had implore assistance; her flight was not yet remained open; nobody else entered. Outcredited.

side the door stood the great dignitaries of ** The train that brought the Queen was both countries, and we behind, observing duc at Biarritz station towards one o'clock. with anxious eyes the physiognomy of the A little before that hour I reached the sta- sovereigns, but unable to divine or to hear tion, and seeing on my arrival that all the anything. Nobody heard what there was

said. Opinion Nationale,' Oct. 4, 1868.

“ The interview lasted twenty minutes ;

[ocr errors]

keep myself by some indoor work or other will never fail. Good night, sir, and again

except, of course, when I've been in I thank ye.” hospital. It was when I'd got a folding job As I picked my way through the rainat a stationer's over in Finsbury, that I pools of the Folly's flags, and thought of heard of poor old father's death. I was the little toy-maker, heartily grateful after sixteen or seventeen then, and had got a weed-like tossings on life's sea for even that few shillings put by. I'd been thinkin' poor shelter, and, in spite of his infirmities,

hard as he'd been, he was my father not only earning for himself an honest livafter all, and my mother had loved him, ing, but acting as a moral leaven and even though he did whop her, and it wasn't right a material benefactor to his poor neighto take no more notice of him than if he'd bours, it occurred to me that “the brickbeen a dog. So I was a-going to write layer man next door " was not the only lazy down to him, and if I found he was hard man, or woman, whom my lame man should up, to send him a crown or so. I daresay make ashamed. Contrasted with his benethere was a bit of pride in that — I wanted ficent energy under difficulties, how utterly to show him that I'd been able to get on contemptible appears the ennui that springs without him. I've mostly found there was form "nothing to do " in the midst of life's summut o' that in anything I've been very most luxurious appliances ! proud of. Well, sir, the very night I was goin' to write, as I hopped home from work, thinking what a good son I was, and

From Blackwood's Magazine. all that, I ran against one of the porters

INTERVIEW BETWEEN THE QUEEN OF in the yard. He didn't know me, but I

SPAIN AND THE FRENCH EMPEROR. knew him as soon as I set eyes on him. He was a Colchester man that used to live At San Sebastian, the place which alone, in in Magdalen Street. Well, sir, I asked all the province of Guipuzcoa, had held for him about my father, and he told me that the Queen when the Carlist war broke out, he was dead and buried. He'd walked Isabella, with her husband, her four children, off the quay one Saturday night, and was her favourite, and her confessor, watched half drowned in the water, and half smoth- with anxious eyes and agonised heart the ered in the mud. It give me a turn, as you progress of the insurrection, which she may think, sir. I wished I could spend the must have foreboded as certain to succeed. money I was going to send him as the Cath- Close by, at the distance of less than a twoolics do. I can't bear to think of it now. hours' railway journey, was the powerful The thief on the cross is my only comfort Sovereign of France, with his wife, her forwhen I do think about it. But perhaps mer subject. What wistful glances were we're too ready to judge. Judge not, that then turned towards Biarritz, what urgent ye be not judged that's another comfort.” messages were sent, what unavailing prayers

The poor cripple was silent for a minute for aid were offered up, may rather be conor two after this, but then he went on in his jectured than positively known. It was said old cheerful voice — “But the rain's over, and believed at the time that the Queen and you'll want to be going. I'm sure I'm herself, disguised and almost unattended. much obliged to you for givin' me your went by night to the imperial residence to company so long. No, sir, thankee, there's tell of her despair and implore succour. nothing you can do for me. I've everything There, it was told, she and Eugenia MonI want – enough and to spare. I've got work tijo, whom an extraordinary destiny had as long as I've got my health ; and when made Empress of the French, embraced that fails, I've got my hospital; and when I and mingled their tears and supplications, die, I humbly hope through Christ's mercy, in vain directed to the intlexible Sovering to creep into heaven. I've everything to who felt that he could not afford w cotomit make me contented. The curate talks to so grave an error as would have been a me like a brother, sir. I've only to ask my armed intervention in the affairs of Spain. other good friend for an order for the hos- Moreover, he bore no love to thai list pital, and he gets it for me just as if I was a crowned Bourbon, the last of a degeneratr gentleman. The little ones all love me, race of kings;, and her passionate apoyaal and most of the people about here are very was all in vain. The French official pres kind. If they'd only be a little kinder to was instructed to deny the interview.. anal themselves, poor souls, I should be quite perhaps it is only its probability and ma happy. Do you know, sir, I call my old mance that make the world believe in it chair here my Ebenezer? Hitherto the as having taken place. A few days later Lord hath helped me, and he's a friend that the Queen did enter France, this tine pub

licly and as a fugitive. There were not waiting-rooms were full of people, I took many persons present to record the circum- refuge in the station-master's office, where stances of that passage into exile, but some there were already a few persons, and there were; and a private letter, too re- amongst others, the Marchioness of Javalplete with graphic and characteristic details quinto, the Countess of Cartagena, the not to have proceeded from an eye-witness, Spanish Consul and his family, and some found its way into a French journal,* and French people. Lucky were we to have may appropriately be introduced here: chosen that place, for a few moments later,

BIARRITZ, Sept. 30, 1868.- After one by order of the Empress, the station was hundred and sixty-eight years that have cleared and everybody was turned into the elapsed since the adoption of Philip Duke outer court; the office in which we were of Anjou by Charles II., to-day, the 30 Sep- was alone exempted from this measure. tember, 1868, at two o'clock in the afternoon, “ It is one o'clock. The Queen is at the the Bourbon dynasty of Spain died before station of St. Jean de Luz. The Emperor my eyes, at the Biarritz railway station, in and Empress arrive at the Biarritz station. the arms of the Emperor. An ocular wit- The Empress comes to speak with the Marness, with some very few privileged persons, chioness of Javalquinto; the Emperor walks of that fatal interview, I think to give you alone upon the platform, with head bent pleasure by relating its circumstantial and and plunged in thought. Suddenly he orexact details.

ders a despatch to be sent to the Queen to It was towards eight o'clock this morn- ask her if she proposes going straight to ing that the Queen, in spite of the advice Pau or to pause at Biarritz. The question, of those around her, decided upon flight, by its form, may be said to have dictated and gave her orders in consequence. Ron- the reply, which was not long in coming : call, Minister of State, prevailed over those the Queen answers that she is going straight who, in the council of the Queen, still ad- to Pau. vocated resistance.

“ The departure from St. Jean de Luz is " A despatch addressed to M. Mon, the signalled, and soon afterwards the special Spanish Ambassador at the Court of France, train entered the Biarritz station. The Queen and received at half-past eight at Biarritz, was alone on the balcony of the saloon cargave intelligence of the catastrophe. Im- riage, the King at the door of the saloon; mediately Señor Mon set out for Hendaye Marfori stood behind the Queen, pompous, (the frontier station), accompanied by Gen- and wearing over his black coat the broad eral de Castelnau, the Emperor's aide-de- ribbon of the Order of Charles III. At camp, to meet the Queen. I will not tell the moment when the Emperor advanced to you all the hesitations, all the resolutions, offer his hand to the Queen, the express all the orders and counter-orders, that train from Paris to Spain, which had been filled

up the morning, and of which the rail- waiting the arrival of the other to proceed way telegraph wire between Biarritz and on its journey, came up, and from it were Hendave was the bearer; it would be weari- heard to proceed cries inost insulting to the some and useless now that the thing is over. Queen - a loud clamour -in which was During that time the Spanish Consul at Bay- especially distinguishable the word Fuera ! onne took measures to secure at Pau the ne-(get out, or out with her). cessary lodgings for the Queen and all her " At these cries the Emperor made a suite.

backward movement, and tears gushed from ** The rumour of all these proceedings the eyes of the Queen, who got out, as well soon spread at Biarritz, and every obtaina- as the King and her children, the high perble carriage was hired by the curious, eager sonages of her suite, Father Claret and the to get to the station, which is about three inevitable Marfori. kilometres from the centre of the town. After having shaken bands with the

" The most accredited version - I will Emperor and kissed the Empress, they all say more, the truest - was that the Queen four — the Emperor, the Empress, the would enter Biarritz and pay a visit at the Queen, and the King - entered the firstinperial villa. It was thought she came to class waiting room, of which the doors had implore assistance; her flight was not yet remained open ; nobody else entered. Outcredited.

side the door stood the great dignitaries of “The train that brought the Queen was both countries, and we behind, observing due at Biarritz station towards one o'clock. with anxious eyes the physiognomy of the A little before that hour I reached the sta- sovereigns, but unable to divine or to hear tion, and seeing on my arrival that all the anything. Nobody heard what there was

said. • Opinion Nationale, Oct. 4, 1868.

“ The interview lasted twenty minutes ;

[ocr errors]

keep myself by some indoor work or other will never fail. Good night, sir, and again

except, of course, when I've been in I thank ye.” hospital. It was when I'd got a folding job As I picked my way through the rainat å stationer's over in Finsbury, that I pools of the Folly's flags, and thought of heard of poor old father's death. I was the little toy-maker, heartily grateful after sixteen or seventeen then, and had got a weed-like tossings on life's sea for even that few shillings put by. I'd been thinkin' poor shelter, and, in spite of his infirmities, that, hard as he'd been, he was my fat not only earning for himself an honest livafter all, and my mother had loved him, ing, but acting as a moral leaven and even though he did whop her, and it wasn't right a material benefactor to his poor neighto take no more notice of him than if he'd bours, it occurred to me that “the brickbeen a dog. So I was a-going to write layer man next door " was not the only lazy down to him, and if I found he was hard man, or woman, whom my lame man should up, to send him a crown or so. I daresay make ashamed. Contrasted with his benethere was a bit of pride in that — I wanted ficent energy under difficulties, how utterly to show him that I'd been able to get on contemptible appears the ennui that springs without him. I’ve mostly found there was form nothing to do " in the midst of life's summut o' that in anything I've been very most luxurious appliances ! proud of. Well, sir, the very night I was goin' to write, as I hopped home from work, thinking what a good son I was, and

From Blackwood's Magazine, all that, I ran against one of the porters

INTERVIEW BETWEEN THE QUEEN OF in the yard. He didn't know me, but I

SPAIN AND THE FRENCH EMPEROR. knew him as soon as I set eyes on him. He was a Colchester man that used to live At San Sebastian, the place which alone, in in Magdalen Street. Well, sir, I asked all the province of Guipuzcoa, had held for him about my father, and he told me that the Queen when the Carlist war broke out, he was dead and buried. He'd walked Isabella, with her husband, her four children, off the quay one Saturday night, and was her favourite, and her confessor, watched half drowned in the water, and half smoth- with anxious eyes and agonised heart the ered in the mud. It give me a turn, as you progress of the insurrection, which she máy think, sir. I wished I could spend the must have foreboded as certain to succeed. money I was going to send him as the Cath- Close by, at the distance of less than a twoolics do. I can't bear to think of it now. hours' railway journey, was the powerful The thief on the cross is my only comfort Sovereign of France, with his wife, her for when I do think about it. But perhaps mer subject. What wistful glances were we're too ready to judge. Judge not, that then turned towards Biarritz, what urgent ye be not judged - that's another comfort.” messages were sent, what unavailing prayers

The poor cripple was silent for a minute for aid were offered up, may rather be conor two after this, but then he went on in his jectured than positively known. It was said old cheerful voice— “ But the rain's over, and believed at the time that the Queen and you'll want to be going. I'm sure I'm herself, disguised and almost unattended, much obliged to you for givin' me your went by night to the imperial residence to company so long. No, sir, thankee, there's tell of her despair and implore succour. nothing you can do for me. I've everything There, it was told, she and Eugenia MonI want- enough and to spare. I've got work tijo, whom an extraordinary destiny had as long as I've got my health ; and when made Empress of the French, embraced that fails, I've got my hospital; and when I and mingled their tears and supplications. die, I humbly hope through Christ's mercy, in vain directed to the inflexible Sovereign to creep into heaven. I've everything to who felt that he could not afford to commit make me contented. The curate talks to so grave an error as would have been a me like a brother, sir. I've only to ask my armed intervention in the affairs of Spain. other good friend for an order for the hos- Moreover, he bore no love to that last pital, and he gets it for me just as if I was a crowned Bourbon, the last of a degenerate gentleman. The little ones all love me, race of kings ;. and her passionate appeal and most of the people about here are very was all in vain. The French official pris kind. If they'd only be a little kinder to was instructed to deny the interview..and themselves, poor souls, I should be quite perhaps it is only its probability and to happy. Do you_kŅow, sir, I call my old mance that make the world believe in chair here my Ebenezer? Hitherto the as having taken place. A few days later Lord hath helped me, and he's a friend that the Queen did enter France, this time pul

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

licly and as a fugitive. There were not waiting-rooms were full of people, I took many persons present to record the circum- refuge in the station-master's office, where stances of that passage into exile, but some there were already a few persons, and there were; and a private letter, too re- amongst others, the Marchioness of Javalplete with graphic and characteristic details quinto, the Countess of Cartagena, the not to have proceeded from an eye-witness, Spanish Consul and his family, and some found its way into a French journal,* and French people. Lucky were we to have may appropriately be introduced here: chosen that place, for a few moments later,

Biarritz, Sept. 30, 1868.- After one by order of the Empress, the station was hundred and sixty-eight years that have cleared and everybody was turned into the elapsed since the adoption of Philip Duke outer court; the office in which we were of Anjou by Charles Il., to-day, the 30 Sep-was alone exempted from this measure. tember, 1868, at two o'clock in the afternoon, “ It is one o'clock. The Queen is at the the Bourbon dynasty of Spain died before station of St. Jean de Luz. The Emperor my eyes, at the Biarritz railway station, in and Empress arrive at the Biarritz station. the arms of the Emperor. An ocular wit- The Empress comes to speak with the Marness, with some very few privileged persons, chioness of Javalquinto; the Emperor walks of that fatal interview, I think to give you alone upon the platform, with head bent pleasure by relating its circumstantial and and plunged in thought. Suddenly he orexact details.

ders a despatch to be sent to the Queen to • It was towards eight o'clock this morn- ask her if she proposes going straight to ing that the Queen, in spite of the advice Pau or to pause at Biarritz. The question, of those around her, decided upon flight, by its form, may be said to have dictated and gave her orders in consequence. Ron- the reply, which was not long in coming : call, Minister of State, prevailed over those the Queen answers that she is going straight wbo, in the council of the Queen, still ad- to Pau. vocated resistance.

“ The departure from St. Jean de Luz is A despatch addressed to M. Mon, the signalled, and soon afterwards the special Spanish Ambassador at the Court of France, train entered the Biarritz station. The Queen and received at half-past eight at Biarritz, was alone on the balcony of the saloon cargave intelligence of the catastrophe. Im- riage, the King at the door of the saloon; mediately Señor Mon set out for Hendaye Marfori stood behind the Queen, pompous, (the frontier station), accompanied by Gen- and wearing over his black coat the broad eral de Castelnau, the Emperor's aide-de- ribbon of the Order of Charles III. At camp, to meet the Queen. I will not tell the moment when the Emperor advanced to you all the hesitations, all the resolutions, offer his hand to the Queen, the express all the orders and counter-orders, that train from Paris to Spain, which had been filled up the morning, and of which the rail- waiting the arrival of the other to proceed way telegraph wire between Biarritz and on its journey, came up, and from it were Hendave was the bearer; it would be weari- heard to proceed cries inost insulting to the some and useless now that the thing is over. Queen - a loud clamour - in which was During that time the Spanish Consul at Bay- especially distinguishable the word Fuera ! onne took measures to secure at Pau the ne-|(get out, or out with her). cessary lodgings for the Queen and all her At these cries the Emperor made a suite.

backward movement, and tears gushed from " The rumour of all these proceedings the eyes of the Queen, who got out, as well soon spread at Biarritz, and every obtaina- as the King and her children, the high perble carriage was hired by the curious, eager sonages of her suite, Father Claret and the to get to the station, which is about three inevitable Marfori. kilometres from the centre of the town. “ After having shaken hands with the

“ The most accredited version - I will Emperor and kissed the Empress, they all say more, the truest — was that the Queen four — the Emperor, the Empress, the would enter Biarritz and pay a visit at the Queen, and the King – entered the firstimperial villa. It was thought she came to class waiting room, of which the doors had implore assistance; her flight was not yet remained open ; nobody else entered. Outcreclited.

side the door stood the great dignitaries of “ The train that brought the Queen was both countries, and we behind, observing duc at Biarritz station towards one o'clock. with anxious eyes the physiognomy of the A little before that hour I reached the sta- sovereigns, but unable to divine or to hear tion, and seeing on my arrival that all the anything. Nobody heard what there was

said. • 'Opinion Nationale,' Oct. 4, 1868.

“ The interview lasted twenty minutes ;

« PreviousContinue »