The Occident, and American Jewish advocate, ed. by I. Leeser, Volume 24

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Isaac Leeser
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Page 168 - When he was set down on the judgment seat, his wife sent unto him, saying, Have thou nothing to do with that just man : for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him.
Page 164 - Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered Thou sayest that I am a king. ' To this end was I born, and for this cause came, I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice.
Page 72 - Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbor's.
Page 309 - Moreover the light of the moon shall be as the light of the sun, and the light of the sun shall be sevenfold, as the light of seven days, in the day that the LORD bindeth up the breach of his people, and healeth the stroke of their wound.
Page 81 - And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.
Page 80 - Now when Daniel knew that the writing was signed, he went into his house; and his windows being open in his chamber toward Jerusalem, he kneeled upon his knees three times a day, and prayed, and gave thanks before his God, as he did aforetime.
Page 168 - When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person : see ye to it.
Page 163 - More servants wait on man Than he'll take notice of, in every path He treads down that which doth befriend him, When sickness makes him pale and wan. Oh mighty love ! Man is one world, and hath Another to attend him.
Page 163 - For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heaven move, and fountains flow; Nothing we see but means our good, As our delight or as our treasure; The whole is either our cupboard of food Or cabinet of pleasure. The stars have us to bed: Night draws the curtain which the sun withdraws; Music and light attend our head ; All things unto our flesh are kind In their descent and being; to our mind In their ascent and cause.
Page 155 - Hope springs eternal in the human breast: Man never is, but always to be blest.

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