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P. 389 b. "Bon Gaultier's." Bon Gaultier.
P. 412 b. On Legge's dismissal see 'Letters of
Junius,' Dec. 19, 1769.

Pp. 416-7. Dartmouth is twice mentioned in
Shenstone's 'Pastoral Ode to Lyttleton.'

P. 418 b. Dartmouth. See Life of T. Robin-
SOD,' 104; 'Life of Venn,' 1835, 68, 163; Sidney's
"Walker,' passim ; 'Life of Tho. Adam'; Benson's
'Fletcher.'

P. 431 b. Charles Leigh. J. Ray, '3 Disc.,' 1713, 237.

P. 432 b. E. Leigh's '12 Cæsars,' repr. Glasg., 1753; earlier dates could be given for some of his books.

P. 434 a. John Owen has two epigrams addressed to Francis Leigh and Mary Egerton, second coll., 133, 134.

P. 437 b. R. Leigh. There should be a reference to Edward Leigh. See 'N. & Q.,' 4th S. i. 456; Todd's 'Life of Milton.' Did Marvell attribute Leigh's book to Parker? Was not Marvell's previous book, 'Rehearsal Transprosed,' a reply to one which he attributed to Parker? The title of Leigh's book is here very inaccurately given, and to repeat the common mistake of printing "Transposer" for Transproser is to miss the whole joke. It is absurdly uncritical to call it "scurrilous and indecent," for Marvell's book is worse.

W. C. B.

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Roberta : 'E m'; his was

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declared void.

William Betts

James Littleton

192
191

193

...

190

...

Sir Thomas Hardy, Knt.
William Harvey

168

272

166

270

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The first poll appears in the Postman for April 21, and 97 is said to be the true one, at which all polled who made 82 it appear they had any right to vote. The second is in 140 the Post Boy for April 19, which says that, notwithstand134 ing this majority of unexceptionable votes for Hardy and Harvey, the Mayor was so incorrigible as to return Betts and Littleton. Hardy and Harvey were declared elected on petition. 1713 James Littleton

130

100

On petition Benson was declared duly elected, but none of the others, and a new writ was ordered for one member.

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William Betts

John Baker...

Daniel Harvey

340

323

308

301

172

169

162

147

William Harvey

89

John Ward

16

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285

174

On petition Littleton, Hardy, William Harvey, and Marriott were declared duly elected.

168

1727 Edward Tucker

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Banks and Bennet were returned, but on petition Fox vice Bennet.

Thomas Pearse

195

164

125

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1831 Richard Weyland ...

Thomas Fowell Buxton

John Gordon

Masterton Ure

Michael G. Prendergast

H. W. Tancred

Bulkeley

G. Bankes

...

Dr. John Harrison...

Three polls were taken; one by the Town Clerk ww agreed to be Morden 406, Cooke 408, but the one he gave

Polls in Smith, 1802, 1806, 1807, 1813, 1818, 1826, 1828, the Mayor was Morden 407, Cooke 401. One taken for 1831 (vice Weyland).

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Morden gave Cooke a majority of two or three, and another taken for Cooke gave the same result for Marden. On petition Cooke vice Morden.

1710 Sir Isaac Rebow, Knt.

...

Sir Thomas Webster, Bart.
William Gore

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On petition Gore vice Webster. 1713 Sir Thomas Webster, Bart. Sir Isaac Rebow, Knt.

William Gore

Nicholas Corsellis

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The latter two seated on petition.

148 1714 Richard Du Cane

Polls in Smith, 1678 (two elections), 1679, 1688, 1698, 1722, 1730, 1747, 1761 (two elections), 1774, 1800, 1802, 1804, 1813, 1818, 1823, 1828, 1830, March, 1831.

1679 Henry Mildmay

John L. Honywood

Sir Isaac Rebow, Knt.

Nicholas Corsellis

129

70

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Essex.

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Sir Thomas Middleton

Sir Eliab Harvey

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1843

1843

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Sir Thomas Webster, Bart.

Sir Isaac Rebow, Knt.

1727 Stamp Brooksbank

Samuel Tufnell

Sir George Cooke, Knt.

669 1735 Vice Mr. Rebow, dead.

1324

Jacob Houblon

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Stamp Brooksbank ..

Polls in Smith, 1741, 1747, 1754, 1768, 1780, 1781, 1784 1324 (two elections), 1788, 1790, 1796, 1806, 1807, 1812, 1818 1437 (two elections), 1820, 1830, 1831 (two elections).

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1693 Vice J. L. Honywood, dead.

Sir Charles Barrington, Bart.
Benjamin Mildmay

2327

1749

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2037

1695 Sir Charles Barrington, Bart. Sir Francis Masham, Bart. Francis Mildmay

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1705 Sir Francis Masham, Bart. Lord Walden

Sir Charles Barrington, Bart.
Sir Richard Child, Bart.

2445

2335

...

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PEACOCK suggests, solely because Mr. Thornbury Dr. Johnson said of him that he paid court to all
mentions it in his 'Songs of the Cavaliers and ages and characters, from Walpole, the steerer of
Roundheads.' The 'Leges Convivales of Ben the realm, to Miss Pulteney in the nursery. His
Jonson were "engraven in marble over the nickname was bestowed upon him, it is said, by
chimney in the Apollo of the Old Devil Tavern Harry Carey the dramatist, and cordially adopted
at Temple-Bar, that being his Club-Room." It was by Pope, as suited to Philips's " eminence in the
also in the same room (the Apollo) that Mr. Isaac infantile style."
Bickerstaff's sister's wedding-dinner took place
(Tatler, No. 79). At this dinner a wag"
behaved in a manner which justifies Thackeray's
remark in his 'English Humourists of the
Eighteenth Century,' that

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you could no more suffer in a British drawing-room, under the reign of Queen Victoria, a fine gentleman or fine lady of Queen Anne's time, or hear what they heard and said, than you would receive an ancient Briton."

As for the old drinking, that lasted down to the
days of Mr. Pickwick. JONATHAN BOUCHIER.

MRS. MARY GODOLPHIN (1652-1678).-An in-
teresting account of the discovery of the coffin of
Mrs. Margaret Godolphin in St. Breage Church,
Cornwall, appears in the Antiquary, May, 1892,
p. 200.
Her burial is thus recorded in the parish

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DANIEL HIPWELL.

Accuracy is, I take it, the first requisite in literary jottings, as Mr. Sala himself would be the first to insist, hence it is rather steep,-1. To misquote an unhappy poet. 2. To assign the property of poet John to poet Ambrose, the bathetic 'Namby Pamby." 3. To call poet John himself Philipps instead of Philips. JAMES HOOPER. Norwich.

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PARISH REGISTERS: CURIOSITIES THEREIN.The words Attorney and Husbandman appended to the burial of " Mr. Gregory Isham" (as recorded in the parish registers of Barwell, in Leicestershire, on October 7, 1656, not 1655) are reproduced from Nichols's 'Leicestershire' (vol. iii. p. 156) in Burn's 'Parish Registers' (edit. 1862, p. 112), as also in R. E. Chester Waters's 'Parish Registers' (edit. 1883, p. 66). The true reading is, however, much more commonplace, as appears by the statement of the Rev. H. Isham Longden, who writes: "I have examined the register, and it is clearly Atturney and housholder." The ink is not faded, and there is absolutely_no_doubt about the word." G. E. C.

It may be noted that in the article appearing in
'Dict. Nat. Biog.,' vol. xxii. p. 41, she is said to
have been buried at Breage on September 16,
1678, i. c., seven days after her decease.
"SILVERLING."-This obsolete word, which occurs
17, Hilldrop Crescent, N.
in the Authorized Version of the English Bible
only in Is. vii. 23, was sufficiently discussed in
"NAMBY PAMBY."-Mr. Sala, in an interesting'N. & Q.,' 6th S. i. 222. But since that time
article on The Cries of London,' in the English the Revised Version has been published, and we
Illustrated Magazine for November, refers to the may be permitted to express our surprise that the
cry of "Fresh oysters!" in "Namby Pamby" word is there retained. The original kehseph
Philipps's poem of The Splendid Shilling.' Now (D) is translated in all other places "silver," or
Mr. Sala's authority is so great in the byways of "pieces of silver." Yet, oddly enough, in a note on
literature that it seems worth while to point out this place in the 'Speaker's Commentary,' a quotation
that he has ascribed that fairly well-known poem is given from Canticles viii. 11, as if the word used
to the wrong man. The reference to oysters is in there were "silverlings," whereas it is "pieces of
the opening lines:-
silver" both in the Authorized and Revised Ver-
sions. The Genevan has the latter rendering in
this place in Isaiah.
W. T. LYNN.
Blackheath.

Happy the man, who, void of cares and strife,
In silken or in leathern purse retains
A Spendid Shilling: He nor hears with pain
New oysters cry'd, nor sighs for chearful ale.
The author of 'The Splendid Shilling' was
John Philips (not Philipps), who was educated at
Winchester, and Christ Church, Oxford; and it is
said that at Winchester he became the darling of
the whole place by the sweetness of his temper.
He was born at Bampton, in Oxfordshire, on
December 30, 1676, and died at Hereford, of con-
sumption, February 15, 1708.

The real original "Namby Pamby" was a very
different man his name was Ambrose Philips, he
was born in 1671, educated at St. John's College,
Cambridge, and died at a good old age in 1749.

"CoÛTE QUI COÛTE." (See 8th S. ii. 391, 431.) -MR. ADAMS hopes that future editors of Pope will correct this hideous blunder. I heartily hope they will not. If the error had been pointed out in Pope's lifetime, he would probably have reviled the corrector, and been careful to adopt his correction in subsequent editions. But as this does not seem to have happened, why should he not go down to posterity with his imperfections on his head? How can it possibly be an editor's duty to set forth what his author ought to have written, instead of what he did write? C. B. MOUNT.

"CRYING THE NOTCHEL."-A short time ago, at St. Helen's County Court, the defendant in an action disclaimed his responsibility on the ground that he had "cried the notchel," an expression which meant, as explained to the judge, that he had published a notice in the journals that he would not be held responsible for debts contracted by his wife. B. D. MOSELEY. Burslem.

THE TRAVELLERS' WAY.-It seems to me not a little remarkable that any clear tradition should still be handed down from lip to lip of the old routes taken by pilgrims in pre-Reformation days. In talking lately to a native of Silverton parish, in the south of Devonshire, I found that he could clearly describe the pilgrimage made in Holy Week in that parish. Being a man of strong but uncultivated antiquarian tastes, he had cherished up in his memory all the old legends taught him in his youth by an elder generation; and I thought that it could not fail to interest some of your readers if I could send his account in his own words so far as possible. I have no means of correcting or proving his way of spelling the names of the places where halts were made; but he has sent me a quaint little map, with the route traced from point to point, which I forward for the Editor's spection. He says:

main door. The pilgrims then passed on up the hill and past the great stone in a field which went up the hill when it heard the church clock at Silverton strike twelve, and on to Rew Cross. From there to the clump of trees on Thorverton Hill they could see the beautiful valley of the Exe, which they called then the Exon. You will understand that prayers were a part of the pilgrimage. and they said them at great length by each cross. They always ended their pains at the great shrine of Silverton, and were there ehriven and ready for Easter."

So runs the legend of my Devonshire friend. It is not wanting in signs of the usual inaccuracy of any far-descended account. For instance, the little jest as to how "the Romans" washed themselves lily white in Lily Lake is evidently a play of fancy called forth by the name of the stream. Such as it is, however, I trust you will think it worthy of preservation in your pages; for this traditional lore becomes rarer every year, and the natural love of antiquity is so unusual in the class to which my informant belongs that in most cases indifference and allowed to pass into oblivion unthese old tales are regarded with contemptuous M. DAMANT.

recorded.

"SHOTES."-Readers of 'Uncle Remus' will remember this word ::

"Stolen out of a Yard in Theobalds Park, Hertfordin-shire, in Cheshunt Parish, on Thursday night the 16th of this Instant, Five Shotes for store, with a large Sow; the latter valued Forty Shillings, the Shotes about 25, a-piece; traced as far as Enfield Chace. If any Tidings Mr. Kichard Eams, Pewterer, at the Black-Bell in Fencan be given to John Armsby, of the said Park, or to church-street, London, so as they may be recovered, or their value, shall have Two Guinea's Reward and ressonable Charges."-Flying Post, No. 603, March 21-2, H. H. S.

"This account of the pilgrims' way was one of the old tales of my father fifty years ago, when we sat by the wood fire with its dogs, or near my uncle's forge, and beard tales of highwaymen, and of the route the old Romans took from one place to the other in Silverton parish. My father and uncle knew more of these things than any one else in those parts, for my grandmother was full of knowledge about the fasts and the confessionals, and the prayers of the old Romans. She said the pilgrims always gathered together at a place called in those days Bablon, which was their starting point. Thence by Bablon pond, where are two islands with alders grow. ing on them, and on to Stumpy Cross, where they took their first rest at a four-cross way. They said prayers and went on on Ash Wednesday to the farm which is still called Ash Farm, and the road which leads to it was Ash Road in my youth. They prayed there all day and performed their foolish superstitions in the utmost discomfort. From there they went to Christ Cross, on the top of a high hill, commonly known when I was young as Criss Cross Farm. They spent Holy Thursday beside this Christ's Cross, and from there they went to where there was a house in recent years called Livenease, but in the days of these Romans it was Levenhase. From there the pilgrims went to Lily Lake, or Lilley's Lake, which is not a lake at all, but a beautiful running stream. There they were said to wash and be made Lily white from all their sins. From the lake their next stage was to the shrine in Silverton Churchyard (that is what they used to call it); a very large yew tree is still standing there as it was in those days. There are yet four steps standing, and on the top step of this shrine is a portion of the upright that the cross was on. The lower step of the shrine is about nine feet in diameter. In the porch, in the main wall of the end of it, are still two basins cut out of stone for the holy water they sprinkled themselves with. They are on each side of the splendid arch of the

1699.

CHARLES II., THE FISH, AND THE ROYAL SOCIETY.-MR. A. G. GREENHILL informs me that he wrote some months ago to N. & Q,' asking for information on the above subject, and expressed his opinion that the story was adapted from an experiment by the Florentine

Academicians.

In 1844 I prepared for the publisher, J. W. Parker, a little book entitled 'Sir Joseph Banks and the Royal Society.' It had an historical introduction on the origin and progress of the Society. In collecting materials for the work I examined what, if any, authority there was for the story of Charles II. and the fish. It was not noticed in the works of Wallis, Sprat, Birch, and Thomson

Weld not being then published. The quarte volume by Sir John Hill, which was devoted to skits on the Royal Society, was a likely place for it; but, although I quoted one of his so-called funny papers, the story of the fish was not noticed, so far as I can remember, except in a passing allusion.

In like manner the story of the Royal Society's mace being the identical "bauble" of Cromwell, crumbles under examination. Curious strangers

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often called at the Royal Society's rooms to look PIE: TART.-Can any of your readers give a at it, and in the Abbotsford edition of 'Woodstock' distinctive definition of the words pie and tart, an engraving of the "bauble" is given. Whereas which are sometimes used indiscriminately, e. g., the original warrant is still in existence authorizing "apple-pie," as in the phrase "apple-pie_order," the making of the present mace as the gift of and apple-tart"? T. C. Charles II. So also with the story of the fish. It may be classed with the silly jokes which were formerly flung at the head of science, and culminated probably with Peter Pindar; although in the early days of the British Association, Punch and the newspapers thought it fair game to shoot their fun at the proceedings of the savants. Weld, in his 'History,' 2 vols., 1848, takes no notice of the fish joke.

Queries.

C. TOMLINSON.

We must request correspondents desiring information on family matters of only private interest to affix their names and addresses to their queries, in order that the answers may be addressed to them direct.

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"FAIR"=LIGHT COMPLEXIONED.-The use of the adjective fair, in the sense of light coloured, with reference to the hair and skin, was well established in Shakespere's time; but I have failed to find evidence that it is very much older. In Wilson's Logic,' 1552, a fair woman" is contrasted with " a brown woman"; but in the context brown is treated as synonymous with foul. I should be glad of references to any other examples of fair in the sense of light complexioned earlier than 1580. HENRY BRADLEY.

6, Worcester Gardens, Clapham Common, S. W. ANDREW VESALIUS.-Could any of your readers inform me where I could get particulars as to the private life of the great anatomist Andrew Vesalius? I am specially anxious to know if he ever married, and, if so, whether he had any children, and whether he was fortunate or the reverse in his choice of a wife. G. M. C.

"BURN THE BELLOWs."-Can you or any of your readers tell me where the following couplet occurs, and what its second line means?Let us do as wise men tell us, S.ng old Rose, and burn the bellows. PATRICK MAXWELL.

Bath.

CATHERINE MACAULAY AND EDMUND Burke. -Where can Mrs. Macaulay's 'Observations on a Pamphlet, entitled " Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents" (London, 1770, 8vo.) be seen? There does not appear to be a copy of this pamphlet in the British Museum. G. F. R. B.

JOHN TRUMBULL.-Where can I find any account of this artist, who painted the famous 'Sortie from Gibraltar,' the engraving from which is one of the masterpieces of William Sharp? JAYDEE.

SIR EDWARD LITTLEHALES.-What post did Sir Edward Littlehales hold in Ireland during 1811 and 1812?

W. C. L. F.

JOSEPH MANTON.-I am writing a notice of the once famous Joe Manton, and I should feel greatly indebted to any of your readers for information as to his parentage and the exact date and place of his birth. The name occurs repeatedly in the registers of St. George's, Hanover Square, where Manton himself was married in 1792, and I have reason to think that he was born in that parish, or at all events in London, though there is no record of his baptism at St. George's. He died June 29, 1835, aged sixty-nine, and was buried at Kensal Green. Col. Hawker, who has a good deal to say about Manton, wrote his epitaph, which is printed at length in the 'Instructions to Young Sportsmen.' I should also be glad of information about his brother John, who, according to Col. Hawker, died in 1834. I give my address, so that communications may be sent to me direct if thought desirable. RICHARD B. PROSSER.

75, Dartmouth Park Road, N.W.

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"THE TRIPLE PLEA."-Can you furnish me with information relating to the history and mystery and legend of an inn sign at Bedingham, in Norfolk, "The Triple Plea." I am unable to find any mention thereof in 'N. & Q.' I believe the sign is unique and very old. Some doggerel verses were formerly printed upon the mugs and pots used in the house, but there is not now one left to tell the tale. The painting on the signboard is an interior, and there are three figures

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