Investigations of the Departments of Psychology and Education of the University of Colorado, Volumes 1-3

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Page 75 - The floating clouds their state shall lend To her; for her the willow bend; Nor shall she fail to see Even in the motions of the Storm Grace that shall mould the Maiden's form By silent sympathy. "The stars of midnight shall be dear To her; and she shall lean her ear In many a secret place Where rivulets dance their wayward round, And beauty born of murmuring sound Shall pass into her face.
Page 34 - Es bildet ein Talent sich in der Stille, Sich ein Charakter in dem Strom der Welt.
Page 6 - Familiar Allusions: A Handbook of Miscellaneous Information; including the Names of Celebrated Statues, Paintings, Palaces, Country Seats, Ruins, Churches, Ships, Streets, Clubs, Natural Curiosities, and the like. By WILLIAM A. WHEELER, Author of " Noted Names of Fiction ;
Page 18 - Every man is an inlet to the same and to all of the same. He that is once admitted to the right of reason is made a freeman of the whole estate. What Plato has thought, he may think ; what a saint has felt, he may feel ; what at any time has befallen any man, he can understand.
Page 43 - To the young mind every thing is individual, stands by itself. By and by, it finds how to join two things and see in them one nature; then three, then three thousand; and so, tyrannized over by its own unifying instinct, it goes on tying things together, diminishing anomalies, discovering roots running under ground whereby contrary and remote things cohere and flower out from one stem.
Page 26 - Meek young men grow up in libraries believing it 'their duty to accept the views which Cicero, which Locke, which Bacon have given, forgetful that Cicero, Locke, and Bacon were only young men in libraries when they wrote these books.
Page 55 - Becker (WA). Translated by the Rev. F. Metcalfe, BD GALLUS : or, Roman Scenes in the Time of Augustus. With Notes and Excursuses. With 26 Illustrat1ons.
Page 32 - Past utterance and past belief, And past the blasphemy of grief, The mysteries of nature's heart, — And though no muse can these impart, Throb thine with nature's throbbing breast, And all is clear from east to west.
Page 24 - I HELD it truth, with him who sings To one clear harp in divers tones, That men may rise on stepping-stones Of their dead selves to higher things.
Page 27 - Action is with the scholar subordinate, but it is essential. Without it he is not yet man. Without it thought can never ripen into truth.

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