Matthew Arnold and His Relation to the Thought of Our Time: An Appreciation and a Criticism

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1904 - 450 pages
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Page 435 - O that thou hadst hearkened to my commandments! Then had thy peace been as a river, and thy righteousness as the waves of the sea...
Page 235 - Hath any of the gods of the nations delivered at all his land out of the hand of the king of Assyria ? Where are the gods of Hamath, and of Arpad ? where are the gods of Sepharvaim, Hena, and Ivah ? have they delivered Samaria out of mine hand...
Page 157 - Seem'd but a cry of desire. Yes! I believe that there lived Others like thee in the past, Not like the men of the crowd Who all round me to-day Bluster...
Page 126 - Oxford, the Oxford of the past, has many faults; and she has heavily paid for them in defeat, in isolation, in want of hold upon the modern world. Yet we in Oxford, brought up amidst the beauty and sweetness of that beautiful place, have not failed to seize one truth, — the truth that beauty and sweetness are essential characters of a complete human perfection.
Page 57 - The great men of culture are those who have had a passion for diffusing, for making prevail, for carrying from one end of society to the other, the best knowledge, the best ideas of their time...
Page 181 - Religion, if we follow the intention of human thought and human language in the use of the word, is ethics heightened, enkindled, lit up by feeling ; the passage from morality to religion is made when to morality is applied emotion. And the true meaning of religion is thus, not simply morality, but morality touched by emotion. And this new elevation and inspiration of morality is well marked by the word
Page 206 - Go ye therefore and teach all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost...
Page 12 - But often, in the world's most crowded streets, But often, in the din of strife, There rises an unspeakable desire After the knowledge of our buried life, A thirst to spend our fire and restless force In tracking out our true, original course...
Page 57 - It does not try to teach down to the level of inferior classes; it does not try to win them for this or that sect of its own, with ready-made judgments and watchwords.
Page 114 - Zal, and all my friends. And I will lay thee in that lovely earth, And heap a stately mound above thy bones, And plant a far-seen pillar over all, And men shall not forget thee in thy grave. And I will spare thy host ; yea, let them go ! Let them all cross the Oxus back in peace ! What should I do with slaying any more?

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