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" For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure; The whole is either our cupboard of food, Or cabinet of pleasure. "
Works - Page 72
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1883
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The temple, sacred poems and private ejaculations. [With] The ..., Volumes 1-2

George Herbert - 1667
...eyes difmount the higlieft ftar : He is in-little all th? fphere. Herbs gladly cure our flefh, becaufe that they Find their acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow, The earth doth reft, heav'nmove, aud fountains flow, Nothing we fee, but means our good, As our delight, or as our...
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The temple, sacred poems and private ejaculations. [With] The synagogue

George Herbert - 1703
...Nothing hath got fo far, But Man hath caught and kept it; as<his Prey. His Eyes difmount the higheft Star: He is in little all the Sphere : . Herbs gladly cure our. Flefh, becaufe that they_ Find their Acquaintance there. i.." :i -» '• !..i-' : ,-'.--' -.' - '...
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The temple: sacred poems, and private ejaculations. To which is added, a ...

George Herbert - 1799
...eyes dilmoimt the higheft ftar : He is in little all the fphere : Herbs gladly cure our flefh, becaufe that they Find their acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow ; The earth doth reft, hezv'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we fee, but means our good, As our dtlight, or as our...
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Sacred Poetry: Consisting of Selections from the Works of the Most Admired ...

Henry Stebbing - 1832 - 402 pages
...; And both, with moons and tides. Nothing hath got so far, But Mail hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star: He is, in...there. For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heav'n, move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see, but means our good ; As our delight, or as our treasure....
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Sacred poetry: consisting of selections from the works of the most admired ...

Henry Stebbing - 1832 - 496 pages
...; And hoth, with moons and tides. Nothing hath got so far, But Man hath caught and kept it. as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star: He is, in little, all the sphere. Herhs gladly cure our flesh, hecause that liiey Find their acquaintance there. For us the winds do...
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Sacred Classics, Or, Cabinet Library of Divinity, Volume 21

Richard Cattermole, Henry Stebbing - 1835
...head with foot hath private amity, Nothing hath got so far, But man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star : He is in...acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow ; The earth doth rest.heav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see, but means our good, As our delight, or as our...
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Sacred Poetry of the Seventeenth Century: Including the Whole of ..., Volume 1

Giles Fletcher - 1836
...amity, And both with moons and tides, Nothing hath got so far, But man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star : He is in...acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow ; The earth doth rest,heay'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see, but means our good, As our delight, or as our...
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The Works of George Herbert, Volume 2

George Herbert - 1838
...amity, And both with moons and tides. Nothing hath got so far, But Man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star : He is in...their acquaintance there. For us the winds do blow ; [flow. The earth doth rest, heaven move, and fountains Nothing we see, but means our good, As our...
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The story-teller; or, Table-book of popular literature. Ed. by R. Bell

Story-teller - 1843 - 410 pages
...amity, And both with moons and tides. Nothing has got so far, But man hath caught and kept it, as his prey. His eyes dismount the highest star: He is in...there. For us the winds do blow ; The earth doth rest, hcav'n move, and fountains flow. Nothing we see, but means our good, As our delight, or as our treasure:...
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The Living Age, Volume 112

1872
...than its predecessor ; or when he spoils a fine stanza by its last two lines after this fashion : — For us the winds do blow, The earth doth rest, heaven move and waters flow; Nothing we see but means our good As our delight or as our measure; The whole is either...
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