The Permanent Elements of Religion: Eight Lectures Preached Before the University of Oxford in the Year 1887 ...

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Macmillan, 1889 - 423 pages
 

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Page x - Printing-House, between the hours of " ten in the morning and two in the afternoon, to " preach eight Divinity Lecture Sermons, the year " following, at St. Mary's in Oxford, between the com" mencement of the last month in Lent Term, and the " end of the third week in Act Term.
Page xlv - Religion is a belief in an everlasting God; that is, a Divine mind and will, ruling the Universe, and holding moral relations with mankind.
Page 334 - Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father but by me.
Page 399 - Christ in my flesh for his body's sake, which is the church: whereof I am made a minister, according to the dispensation of God which is given to me for you, to fulfil the word of God; even the mystery which hath been hid from ages and from generations, but now is made manifest to his saints: to whom God would make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles ; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory...
Page 149 - It swept away from the field of its vision the whole of the great soul-theory which had hitherto so completely filled and dominated the minds of the superstitious and the thoughtful alike. For the first time in the history of the world, it proclaimed a salvation which each man could gain for himself and by himself, in this world, during this life, without any the least reference to God, or to gods, either great or small.
Page lxi - But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; And your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil.
Page 350 - Make thy claim of wages a zero, then hast thou the world under thy feet. Well did the wisest of our time write, it is only with renunciation that life, properly speaking, can be said to begin.
Page 40 - Those only are happy (I thought) who have their minds fixed on some object other than their own happiness; on the happiness of others, on the improvement of mankind, even on some art or pursuit, followed not as a means, but as itself an ideal end.
Page ix - House, between the hours of ten in the " morning and two in the afternoon, to preach eight Divinity " Lecture Sermons, the year following, at St. Mary's in " Oxford, between the commencement of the last month "in Lent Term, and the end of the third week in Act
Page 400 - ... the noblest souls of whatever creed, the pagan Empedocles as well as the Christian Paul, have insisted on the necessity of an inspiration, a joyful emotion, to make moral action perfect; an obscure indication of this necessity is the one drop of truth in the ocean of verbiage with which the controversy on justification by faith has flooded the world.

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