The Interpretation of Cosmic and Mystical Experiences

Front Cover
James Clarke & Co., 1969 - 175 pages
Albert Schweitzer said 'All the problems of religion ultimately go back to the one - the experience I have of God within myself differs from knowledge concerning Him which I derive from the world ... In the world He is impersonal force; within me, He reveals Himself as Personality'. In his earlier books, Dr Crookall dealt with the most important of psychical experiences, namely, out-of-the-body experiences, popularly called astral projections. These are, he says, natural and normal to mankind. This work is concerned with cosmic and mystical experiences, the 'highest' and most significant of which we are capable. These are also natural and normal to mankind. In the First Part, a large number of experiences of at-one-ment are assembled and classified, preparatory to a consideration of their incidence and nature. Some people have at-one with inanimate objects, others with animate objects (nature), still others with people, and many with God. These various groups are shown to overlap - there is, says Crookall, a complete and unbroken spectrum beginning with minerals and ending with God. It is clear that at-one-ment with God is not, as some writers have supposed, essentially distinct from at-one-ment with nature. On the basis of this, the author agrees with Dr Raynor Johnson and the Revd Sidney Spencer: the latter concluded 'Cosmic consciousness is the natural complement of the experience of union with God'. The Second Part of the book deals with descriptions of at-one-ment that have hitherto been entirely neglected by writers on this important subject, namely, those of 'communicators', the supposed dead. Some supposed dead 'communicators' are shown to describe at-one-ment with inanimate objects, others with nature, with people, and still others with God. Again, these groups overlap to form an unbroken spectrum of experience, as in the experiences of the living - a strong suggestion of surviving souls. In point of fact, Crookall notes that mystical experiences seem to be more frequent among the dead than the living! This, of course, might have been expected. Human mystical experiences are here considered, for the first time, in relation to the correlation suggested in the author's first book.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

c Atoneness with animate objects and with people
24
PERIENCES
37
3 ANAESTHETISED PERSONS CAST OUT OF THE BODY
45
DISCUSSION OF ATONENESS IN GENERAL
53
SECOND PART
65
DISCUSSION OF THE COMMUNICATIONS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS
89
APPENDIX IIIANALOGIES BETWEEN MYSTICAL AND PSYCHICAL
99
APPENDIX IVDOES DISSOCIATION AS WELL AS ASSOCIATION
131
GLOSSARY
155
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
168
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information