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" A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. "
The Essay on Self-reliance - Page 2
by Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1905 - 51 pages
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Select Essays and Poems

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1808 - 120 pages
...and clearer than before you read the play ? Does E. mean that we should always express our opinions ? they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty....teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow...
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Essays

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1841 - 371 pages
...Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with...teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humoured inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

1842
...grandest strokes, there we feel most at home.'— Essay i., p. 6. ' In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts ; they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty.' — Essay ii., p. 46. This is cheering as to the potentiality of the species. Hence there can be little...
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The Eclectic Review, Volume 12; Volume 76

Samuel Greatheed, Daniel Parken, Theophilus Williams, Josiah Conder, Thomas Price, Jonathan Edwards Ryland, Edwin Paxton Hood - 1842
...grandest strokes, there we feel most at borne.' — Essay i., p. 6. ' In every work of genius wo recognise our own rejected thoughts ; they come back to us with a certain nlienated majesty.' — Essay ii., p. 46. This is cheering as to the potentiality of the species. Hence...
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Essays

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1848 - 333 pages
...the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow...
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Essays, Lectures and Orations

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1848 - 364 pages
...Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with...teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humoured inflexibility then most when • the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else,...
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Essays, orations and lectures

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1848 - 385 pages
...Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts : they come back to us with...majesty. Great works of art have no more affecting D lesson for us than this. They teach us to abide by ou spontaneous impression with good humoured inflexibility...
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Twelve Essays

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1849 - 261 pages
...Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts : they come back to us with...us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good humoured inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow...
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Twelve Essays

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1849 - 261 pages
...Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognise our own rejected thoughts : they come back to us with...us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good humoured inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow...
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Essays, First Series

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1850 - 333 pages
...the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected...teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow...
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