Studies in Philology, Volume 18

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University of North Carolina Press, 1921
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Page 382 - And Saul arose from the earth; and when his eyes were opened, he saw no man; but they led him by the hand and brought him into Damascus. And he was three days without sight, and neither did eat nor drink.
Page 250 - Anon they move In perfect phalanx to the Dorian mood Of flutes and soft recorders...
Page 402 - And Ananias went his way, and entered into the house; and putting his hands on him said, Brother Saul, the Lord, even Jesus, that appeared unto thee in the way as thou eamest, hath sent me, that thou mightest receive thy sight, and be filled with the Holy Ghost.
Page 190 - The good-morrow I wonder by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then, But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the seven sleepers' den? Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee. And now good morrow to our waking souls, Which...
Page 222 - Before I understood this place Appointed for my second race, Or taught my soul to fancy aught But a white, celestial thought; When yet I had not walked above A mile or two from my first, love, And looking back — at that short space — Could see a glimpse of his bright face...
Page 357 - Alas ! poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio ; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times ; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is ! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.
Page 398 - I was confirmed in this opinion, that he, who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem...
Page 189 - To live in grots, and caves, and hate the day Because it shows the way, The way which from this dead and dark abode Leads up to GOD, A way where you might tread the sun, and be More bright than he. But as I did their madness so discuss, One whisper'd thus, This ring the Bridegroom did for none provide But for His Bride.
Page 231 - ... to all the art of cavalry, that having in sport, but with much exactness and daily muster, served out the rudiments of their soldiership in all the skill of...
Page 187 - The corn was orient and immortal wheat, which never should be reaped, nor was ever sown. I thought it had stood from everlasting to everlasting. The dust and stones of the street were as precious as gold : the gates were at first the end of the world. The green trees when I saw them first through one of the gates transported and ravished me, their sweetness and unusual beauty made my heart to leap, and almost mad with ecstasy, they were such strange and wonderful things.

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