The Ridpath Library of Universal Literature ...: A Biographical and Bibliographical Summary of the World's Most Eminent Authors, Including the Choicest Extracts and Masterpieces from Their Writings, Comprising the Best Features of Many Celebrated Compilations, Notably the Guernsey Collection, the De Puy Collection, the Ridpath Collection, All Carefully Rev. and Arranged by a Corps of the Most Capable Scholars, Volume 1

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John Clark Ridpath
Globe publishing Company, 1898
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A biographical and bibliographical summary of the World's most eminent authors, including the choicest extracts and masterpieces from their writings, comprising the best features of many celebrated compilations, notably the Guernsey collection, the De Puy collection, the Ridpath collection, all carefully rev. and arranged by a corps of the most capable scholars.
 

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Page 118 - His tuneful breast enjoys. For him, the Spring Distils her dews, and from the silken gem Its lucid leaves unfolds : for him, the hand Of Autumn tinges every fertile branch With blooming gold, and blushes like the morn. Each passing hour sheds tribute from her wings; And still new beauties meet his lonely walk, And loves unfelt attract him. Not a breeze Flies o'er the meadow, not a cloud imbibes The setting sun's effulgence, not a strain From all the tenants of the warbling shade Ascends, but whence...
Page 11 - Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes Up the wondrous tale, And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth ; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 11 - I HEARD a voice from heaven, saying unto me, Write, From henceforth blessed are the dead which die in the Lord : even so saith the Spirit ; for they rest from their labours.
Page 11 - Nearer, my God, to Thee, Nearer to Thee ! E'en though it be a cross That raiseth me ! Still all my song shall be, Nearer, my God, to Thee, Nearer to Thee...
Page 11 - IT is a celebrated thought of Socrates, that if all the misfortunes of mankind were cast into a public stock, in order to be equally distributed among the whole species, those who now think themselves the most unhappy, would prefer the share they are already possessed of before that which would fall to them by such a division.
Page 11 - ... who lie in it, are apt to fill the mind with a kind of melancholy, or rather thoughtfulness that is not disagreeable. I yesterday passed a whole afternoon in the church-yard, the cloisters, and the church, amusing myself with the tombstones and inscriptions that I met with in those several regions of the dead. Most of them recorded nothing else...
Page 11 - What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball; What though no real voice nor sound Amid their radiant orbs be found ; In reason's ear they all rejoice, And utter forth a glorious voice ; Forever singing as they shine, The hand that made us is divine.
Page 11 - ... when I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind. When I read the several dates of the tombs, of" some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together.
Page 11 - Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage. So when an angel, by divine command, With rising tempests shakes a guilty land (Such as of late o'er pale Britannia passed), Calm and serene he drives the furious blast; And, pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
Page 11 - Obedient to thy will ; The sea that roar'd at thy command, At thy command was still. In midst of dangers, fears, and death, Thy goodness I'll adore, And praise thee for thy mercies past, And humbly hope for more. My life, if thou preserv'st my life, Thy sacrifice shall be ; And death, if death must be my doom, Shall join my soul to thee.

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