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and in building up in such vicinity a permanent industry, so that money and time expended in the building of homes and other improvements incidental to the development of this industry shall not represent a permanent loss;

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved: That we invoke the assistance of the Congress of the United States, by the use of every means reasonably within its power, to enable the people of Central Wyoming to secure the agricultural development of the North Platte Valley by the construction and completion of the Casper-Alcova Irrigation Project.

Approved February 4, 1925.

HOUSE JOINT MEMORIAL NO. 4.

HISTORIC RESERVES.

Memorializing the Congress of the United States to set aside Old Fort Laramie and Old Fort Bridger and Independence

Rock as Historic Reserves.

Whereas, Old Fort Laramie and Old Fort Bridger are historic places of nation wide importance in the heart of the Rocky Mountain region, situated on the Continental Highway over which passed the great army of settlers, who were attracted by the lure of gold and agricultural possibilities of the far West.

Whereas, Never in the history of the world has there been a more picturesque, dramatic and hazardous migration of the sturdy sons and daughters who saved this country to America, this being made possible by the protection afforded by these Posts on the far Frontier.

Whereas, Old Fort Laramie, established in 1834, as a Fur Trading Post, was purchased by the Federal Government and garrisoned as a Military Post in 1849 and was used until its abandonment in 1890, and its buildings are now in a state of decay and the ownership is in private hands, and

Whereas, This is a most important post in the Rocky Mountain. Region, was the scene of many Indian conferences and the place of many important treaties, and

Whereas, It is situated on the great historic highway known as the Oregon Trail.

Whereas, Old Fort Bridger, a rendezvous of the trappers, was first established as a trading post in 1834, by the famous Scout, Jim Bridger; and visited in early days by such noted characters as General Ashley, Sublette, Robert Campbell and Bonneville and many others, and

Whereas, In 1847 it became a resting place for the Latter Day Saints who were the pioneers in the reclamation of the Great West,

and

Whereas, In 1849 came the great army of gold seekers on their way to California, among them the ill-fated Donner party.

Whereas, in 1853 the first settlement of Anglo-Saxon people to engage in Agricultural and Reclamation work within the borders of Wyoming, was at this point.

Whereas, In 1857 the army of General Albert Sidney Johnson, guided from Fort Laramie by Jim Bridger, established here a Government Military Fort, naming it Fort Bridger, in honor of their guide.

Whereas, This was a home station for the Overland Stage Line established in 1859 and the Pony Express established in 1860, the only one remaining in good preservation on the entire route, and

Whereas, In 1861 this Post became an important station in the Overland Telegraph Company, and

Whereas, It is the most important historical point on the Lincol Highway and in the direct route of the Aerial Mail, and

Whereas, The descendants of the early settlers of this country in their appreciation and gratitude for the services rendered to the Great West in the protection afforded by these noted Forts and in order that these historic places so prominent in Western American history may be re-established, restored and perpetuated and be kept for all time in reverent memory of the high ambitions and devoted sacrifices of their forebears.

Section 1. Therefore be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Wyoming and the Senate concurring, that the Congress of the United States be memorialized to purchase and set aside Old Fort Laramie and Old Fort Bridger as Historic Reserves and Independence Rock.

Section 2. That copies of this Memorial be sent to the Congressional Delegations from Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, Colorado, Idaho Oregon and Washington.

Approved February 25, 1925.

HOUSE JOINT MEMORIAL NO. 5.

PURNELL BILL.

A House Joint Memorial memorializing Congress to hasten the enactment of House Resolution No. 157, Sixty-eighth Congress, known as the Purnell Bill and giving legislative assent to its provisions.

Be It Resolved, By the House of Representatives of the State of Wyoming, the Senate concurring:

Whereas, The farmers and stockmen of Wyoming in common with the whole agricultural interests of a nation have been and are suffering under adverse conditions affecting these basic industries, and

Whereas, In the past the aid of the Federal Government has been chiefly devoted to grants encouraging the study of problems of scientific production of agricultural products and but little attention given to the problems and conditions affecting the economic and sociological factors of agriculture, and

Whereas, The Purnell bill will promote research and experimentation in the important problems bearing upon the manufacture, use, distribution and marketing of agricultural products and whereas such scientific researches have for their purpose the establishment and maintenance of a permanent and efficient agricultural industry, and

Whereas, The Purnell Bill has had the careful study and formal approval of the President's Agricultural Commission and has been passed by the House of Representatives of the United States Congress;

Therefore, Be It Resolved, That the Congress of the United States be and is hereby urged to enact House Resolution No. 157 known as the Purnell Bill, providing for the more complete endowment of agricultural experiment stations with special attention to the economic factors affecting agriculture, and

Be It Further Resolved: That the Legislature of the State of Wyoming hereby gives its assent to the provisions of said Purnell Bill, and in the event that said Bill becomes a law of the United States, the Legislature of the State of Wyoming hereby assents thereto and to the University of Wyoming, accepting the moneys to be received by it under the provisions of said Bill, together with the obligations thereby imposed, and to the acceptance by the University of all other benefits, advantages and advancements accruing to it under the provisions of said Bill.

Be It Further Resolved, That a copy of this memorial be sent to each of the members of the Congressional Delegation of this State in Congress, to the Secretary of Agriculture and to the President of the United States with the urgent request that they employ their best efforts to secure the immediate enactment of this measure into law.

Approved February 25, 1925..

SENATE JOINT MEMORIAL NO. 4.

Opposing Enactment of Bill Establishing Grazing Districts. Memorializing Congress protesting against the passage of the bill now before the Senate of the United States, known as S. 4076, introduced January 26, 1925, providing for the establishment of Grazing Districts on the public lands of the United States and Alaska, and regulating their beneficial use by livestock.

BE IT RESOLVED BY THE SENATE OF THE STATE
OF WYOMING,

The House of Representatives Concurring, That the Congress of the United States be memorialized as follows:

It is the solemn judgment of the Legislature of the State of Wyoming that S. 4076 now before the Senate of the United States providing for the establishment of grazing districts on the public lands in the United States and Alaska and regulating their beneficial use by livestock, should not be enacted into law and we urgently request that the Congress of the United States do not pass said bill.

Be It Further Resolved, That a certified copy of this Joint Memorial be sent to each of the members of the Congressional Delegation of this State in Congress, to the Chairman of the Committee in Congress to which this measure has been referred, and to the President of the United States, with the urgent request that they employ their best efforts to defeat the enactment of this measure into law.

Approved February 25, 1925.

SENATE JOINT MEMORIAL No. 3.

TITLE TO SCHOOL SECTIONS.

Whereas, at a regular meeting of the State Board of Land Commissioners of the State of Wyoming, held on the fifth day of February, A. D. 1925, it was recommended by unanimous vote that the Legislature of the State of Wyoming memorialize the Congress of the United States as follows:

SENATE JOINT MEMORIAL.

Whereas, More than thirty-four years have elapsed since the date of admission of the State of Wyoming, July 10, 1890, on which date title vested in the State to the land granted for the support of its common schools, if surveyed and not then known to be mineral in character, and

Whereas, It appears that the title to every school section within the State is clouded by reason of the fact that at any time any citizen of the United States who desires to acquire title to said school sections, through mineral entry or otherwise, may make application and the United States Land Department will entertain such applications, or bring charges alleging the land to be mineral in character at the time the title to the State was granted, and

Whereas, In the interest of fairness and stability of titles and protection of the school revenue of the State and individual citizens who have made lease or purchase from the State, we believe that not more than fifteen years from the date of admission of the State, if the land was then surveyed, or ten years from the date of the approval of the survey, if unsurveyed, should be allowed for inquiry, after the expiration of which the title to the land granted for school purposes should not be open to inquiry, question or attack on account of their alleged mineral character.

Therefore, Be It Resolved, By the Senate of the State of Wyoming, the House of Representatives concurring, that the Congress of the United States be memorialized to take steps to provide the legislation necessary to remove the cloud from the school sections of the State by limiting the time in which the title to the said school sections shall be open to inquiry, question or attack, and

Be It Further Resolved, That a copy of this memorial be sent to Honorable Francis E. Warren, Honorable John B. Kendrick, and Honorable Charles E. Winter, representatives in Congress from the State of Wyoming.

Approved February 25, 1925.

Secretary's Certificate of Authentication

THE STATE OF WYOMING,

Office of the

SECRETARY OF STATE

SS.

I, F. E. LUCAS, Secretary of State of the State of Wyoming, do hereby certify that the foregoing, being pages One to Two Hundred Seventy-three, both inclusive, is a full, true and correct copy of each and all of the Acts, Resolutions and Memorials passed by the Eighteenth State Legislature of the State of Wyoming, and approved by the Governor of the said State, or which legally became laws without approval, as appear of record in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Wyoming.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Great Seal of the State of Wyoming.

Done at Cheyenne, the Capital, This Sixteenth day of March, A. D. 1925.

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