Where No Man Has Gone Before: A History of Apollo Lunar Exploration Missions, Volume 10

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Management, Scientific and Technical Information Division, 1989 - 415 pages
When the crew of Apollo 11 splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969, Americans hailed the successful completion of the most complex technological undertaking of the 20th century: landing humans on the moon and returning them safely to earth. This document records the engineering and scientific accomplishments of the people who made lunar exploration possible. It shows how scientists and engineers worked out their differences and conducted a program that was a major contribution to science as well as a stunning engineering accomplishment.
 

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Page 333 - The recommendations of this conference are limited to the 10-year period following the first Apollo lunar landings because a decade seems to be the approximate maximum time for which developments can be meaningfully forecast. In addition, the long lead times involved in the development of equipment for use in space flight require that recommendations be made to cover this period of time. In carrying out these recommendations, it will be necessary for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...
Page 202 - ... QUESTIONS In order to make the case for manned planetary exploration, it is essential, in fact, absolutely essential, to ask the questions in the proper way. First of all, what's it all about? What are we after? I think the answer to these fundamental questions has been given, and given quite well, by the Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences and by the Lunar and Planetary Missions Board of NASA. Most scientists agree that there are three fundamental problems: l) to understand...
Page 312 - The Report of the Summer Study Conducted Under the Auspices of the Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences at the State University of Iowa, June 17-August 10, 1962.
Page 143 - There doesn't appear to be too much of a general color at all. However, it looks as though some of the rocks and boulders, of which there are quite a few in the near area, it looks as though they're going to have some interesting colors to them.
Page 37 - THE HISTORY OR EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE OF EVENTS BY WHICH THE MOON HAS ARRIVED AT ITS PRESENT CONFIGURATION NOTE: FROM A MEETING SPONSORED BY THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, SPACE SCIENCES BOARD.
Page 61 - F. Eisele, Theodore C. Freeman, Richard F. Gordon, Jr. , Russell L. Schweickart, David R. Scott, and Clifton C. Williams, Jr. Four members of this class died during training: Bassett, Freeman, and Williams, killed in aircraft crashes, and Chaffee, killed in the AS-204 fire on January 27, 1967.
Page 6 - From a scientific standpoint, there seems little room for dissent that man's participation in the exploration of the moon and planets will be essential, if and when it becomes technologically feasible to include him. Man can contribute critical elements of scientific judgment and discrimination in conducting the scientific exploration of these bodies which can never be fully supplied by his instruments, however complex and sophisticated they may become.
Page 273 - McDougall argues in . . . the Heavens and the Earth: A Political History of the Space Age (New York: Basic Books...
Page 143 - We'll get to the details of what's around here, but it looks like a collection of just about every variety of shape, angularity, granularity, about every variety of rock you could find. The colors — well, it varies pretty much depending on how you're looking relative to the zerophase point.
Page 349 - NASA's first manned satellite project (Mercury). Robert R. Gilruth was named project manager. 1959 January: In a report of the staff of the House Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration entitled "The Next Ten Years in Space, 1959-1969...

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