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THE DEBATES

OF THE

SENATE OF CANADA

IN THE

FIRST SESSION OF THE NINTH PARLIAMENT OF CANADA, APPOINTED TO MEET FOR THE DESPATCH OF BUSINESS ON WEDNESDAY, THE SIXTH DAY

OF FEBRUARY, IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE REIGN OF

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I have it in command to let you know that His Hon. ANDREW TREW WOOD, of the city of Excellency the Governor General does not see Hamilton, Ont.

fit to declare the causes of his summoning the

Hon. LYMAN MELVIN JONES, of the city of present Parliament of Canada until the Speaker Toronto, Ont.

of the House of Commons shall have been chosen according to law; but, to-morrow, at the hour

Hon. GEORGE MCHUGH, of the county of of three o'clock in the afternoon, His Excellency Victoria, Ont.

Hon. ROBERT MACKAY, of the city of Montreal, Que.

The House was adjourned during plea

sure.

will declare the causes of his calling this Parliament.

The Deputy Governor was pleased to retire, and the House of Commons withdrew. The Senate then adjourned.

THE SENATE.

Ottawa, Thursday, Feb. 7, 1901. The Speaker took the Chair at 2.30 p.m. PRAYERS.

NEW SENATOR.

Hon. JOHN VALENTINE ELLIS, of the city of St. John, N.B., was introduced and took his seat.

The Senate was adjourned during plea

sure.

After some time the Senate was resumed. His Excellency the Right Trusty and Right Well-Beloved Cousin the Right Hon. ourable Sir Gilbert John Elliot, Earl of Minto and Viscount Melgund of Melgund, County of Forfar, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, Baron Minto of Minto. County of Roxburgh, in the Peerage of Great Britain, Baronet of Nova Scotia, Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Distin guished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, &c., &c., Governor General of Canada, being seated on the Throne,

The Speaker commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to proceed to the House of Commons and acquaint that House,

It is His Excellency's pleasure they attend him immediately in this House.

Who being come with their Speaker, The Hon. Louis Philippe Brodeur said:MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY :

The House of Commons have elected me as their Speaker, though I am but little able to fulfil the important duties thus assigned to me.

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THE SPEECH FROM THE THRONE. His Excellency the Governor General was then pleased to open the Session by a Gracious Speech to both Houses :Honourable Gentlemen of the Senate:

Gentlemen of the House of Commons: Since our last meeting the empire has been called on to lament the demise of her late Majesty Queen Victoria. The universal regret and sympathy with which the tidings of her decease have been received throughout the entire civilized world, afford the best testimony to the manner in which she has, at all times, discharged her duties, both as a woman and a sovereign, throughout her unprecedentedly long

and glorious reign, and I will venture to add that in no portion of her vast territories were those sentiments more profoundly felt than in the Dominion of Canada.

You will, I am sure, take early action to express your sympathy with the Royal Family in their bereavement and your loyalty to the new sovereign.

The Canadian contingents to South Africa have nearly all returned, and it affords me a very great gratification to be able to assure you that the valour and good conduct of our Canadian soldiers have called forth the highest encomiums from the several commanders under whom they have served during the arduous

contest.

If in the performance of those duties, I should at any time fall into error, I pray that the fault may be imputed to me, and not to the ComThe union of the several provinces of Austramons, whose servant I am, and who, through lia into one confederation, upon lines closely

me, the better to enable them to discharge their

duty to their King and country, humbly claim all their undoubted rights and privileges, especially that they may have freedom of speech in their debates, access to Your Excellency's person at all seasonable times, and that their proceed

ings may receive from Your Excellency the most favourable interpretation.

The Honourable the Speaker of the Sen. ate then said:

Mr. SPEAKER :

I am commanded by His Excellency the Governor General to declare to you that he fully

resembling those on which our own Dominion

has been established, marks another important step towards the consolidation of the outlying portions of the empire, and, I am well assured, will call forth your most sincere congratulations

to the new commonwealth.

Acting on the advice of my ministers, I had, previously to the great grief which has fallen upon the nation, tendered an invitation on your behalf to His Royal Highness the Duke of Cornwall and York to conclude his intended visit to Australasia by one to the Dominion of Canada, and I am glad to be able to inform you that His

Royal Highness has been pleased to signify his acceptance of the same. I still hope that that visit may not be considered impossible. I have no doubt of the warmth of the welcome with which he will be received.

My government has learned with great satisfaction of the progress being made with the Pacific cable scheme, and I trust that nothing may occur to delay its early completion.

Last summer, I made a tour through Canada as far as Dawson City, and was everywhere received with unqualified proofs of devotion and loyalty. During my journey, I was, from personal observation, much impressed with the great activity displayed in the development of the mining and agricultural industries of the country, and with the substantial increase in its population. The thrift, energy and lawabiding character of the immigrants are a subject of much congratulation, and afford ample proof of their usefulness as citizens of the Dominion.

It gives me great pleasure to note the excellent display made by Canada at the Universal Exposition in Paris. The fine quality and varied character of Canadian natural and industrial products is evidenced by the number of awards won in nearly every class of the competition. It is a remarkable testimony to the effectiveness of our cold storage transportation facilities, that fresh fruit grown in Canada secured a large number of the highest awards. It is extremely gratifying to observe that, as a result of the display of Canadian resources, considerable foreign capital has found its way to Canada for investment and large orders from foreign countries have been received for Canadian goods.

The improvement of the St. Lawrence route continues to engage the very careful attention of my government. During the past year ship channels have been widened and deepened, additional lights and buoys have been provided and, in a short time, there will be telegraph and cable communication with Belle Isle. These additional securities will tend to make safer and more efficient than ever our great waterway between the lakes and the Atlantic.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons: The accounts for the past year will be laid before you.

The Estimates for the succeeding year will likewise be placed upon the Table at an early date.

Honourable Gentlemen of the Senate:

Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

I commend to your earnest consideration the measures to be submitted to you, invoking the Divine blessings upon the important labours on which you are again entering.

His Excellency the Governor General was pleased to retire, and the House of Commons withdrew.

The Senate adjourned.

THE SENATE.

Ottawa, Monday, February 11, 1901.

The SPEAKER took the Chair at Three o'clock.

Prayers and routine proceedings.

DELAYED RETURNS.

Hon. Sir MACKENZIE BOWELL-I should like to ask the hon. Secretary of State if there is any probability this session of my receiving the final return to the motion made in 1899, as to the sale of the school lands in Manitoba, the amount received from them, the amount on hand, the amount of interest, &c. I ask this early in the session, because I have seen in the newspapers that the government of Manitoba have been interviewing the ministers as to a claim, either to secure to that province the lands or whatever amount of money may be on hand, and if we are to deal with that question during the present session, it is important that we should have the particulars referred to in the motion carried by the House. The hon. Secretary of State will remember that a return was partially made out, and sent back to be Measures will be submitted to you for the completed up to the present time. It would better supervision of the export trade in food be easy to have the return, so prepared, products, and also in connection with the Post up to the present date. Will the hon. genOffice, the Pacific cable and various other sub-tleman call the attention of the Minister of jects.

I am glad to observe that the revenue and the general volume of trade continue undiminished, and even show a moderate increase over the very large figures attained during the past

year.

the Interior to the matter?

Hon. Mr. SCOTT-I will call the atten- men. She came to the Throne at a time tion of the Minister of the Interior to the subject, and endeavour to have the return here. I presume a good deal of it will be in the minister's report. I have not examined it.

THE ADDRESS.

MOTION.

The Order of the Day having been called: Consideration of His Excellency the Governor General's speech on the opening of the first session of the ninth parliament.

Hon. Mr. ELLIS said: Permit me to ask your kind consideration while I proceed with the task, the pleasant task which I have undertaken to perform here to-day, that of moving an address of thanks to His Excellency the Governor General for the speech with which he was pleased to open this session of parliament. I am the more emboldened to ask that favour from the fact that I know great consideration is shown to members of this House who make their appearance here for the first time, and also there may be sympathetic recollections in the minds of hon. gentlemen of their own feelings, when they for the first time lifted up their voice in this Chamber, when the sound of their speech seemed strange to them, and when they struggled to give utterance to their sentiments. I can scarcely plead youth and inexperience, but I can plead the inexperience of which the years make us so conscious, when we enter for the first time upon the discharge of new duties and try untrodden paths. Before I make the formal motion, I should like to refer to one or two paragraphs in the speech of His Excellency. The first paragraph announces the death of the sovereign. I do not propose to enter upon any lengthy discussion of the sovereign as a constitutional ruler, because I am quite satisfied that that will be discussed on another occasion by gentlemen in this House who are much more capable of speaking upon those constitutional questions than I am. But it is impossible to refrain from making one or two observations with reference to the long reign which is now ended, undoubtedly the most glorious reign in the annals of England. The Queen has outlived two or three generations of states

when there was a great-I would not perhaps use such a strong word as dissatisfaction-a great deal of agitation in England, and when some men thought that the period was in sight when the Crown might cease to be one of the estates of the realm. The Queen has passed away. The Crown is stronger in the affections of the people than it ever was. There is no question whatever as to the advisability of continuing the Crown and as to its remaining one of the great factors of the government of the country. I desire more especially to make reference to the sovereign herself as an individual, as one exercising power through her influence, rather than from the fact that she possessed authority. The Queen, during her reign, has endeared herself to her people, not only by her constitutional rule, not only by the fact that she recognized the men whom she selected as her advisers, but also because she entered into all the joys and into the spirit of her people in all the great matters which have so developed in the United Kingdom in the last sixty odd years. She was not only a sagacious and far-seeing monarch, but her judgments were strengthened by unparalleled experience. She was constantly strengthened by a strict sense of duty. The simplicity of her life, when she unbent herself in her domestic circle, appealed to the hearts of all, because every happy home in England and the world over recognized that the Queen, as an individual person, had the feelings of common humanity, and that she was, just in her own way, and in her own life, such a person as we might take to our own hearts, and as the people of England did take to their hearts. Her words of consolation, her messages of pity and tenderness, her expressions of kindly feeling for suffering people everywhere, bound her to countless hearts. Her sense of duty so high; her rule so beneficial to the world, her good sense so potential, she will stand out always as a great ruler, and her influence will be felt for ages. It is difficult for us, I think, to realize the struggles which the sovereign may make for a quiet home for such a life as we are able to lead in our own domestic circles. Shakespeare describes Henry V. on the battlefield of Agincourt, the night before the bat

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