Legislative Principles: The History and Theory of Lawmaking by Representative Government

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2006 - 667 pages
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Contents

WHAT IS LAW?
3
MONARCHS AND SOVEREIGNTY
27
LAWMAKING BY ASSEMBLIES
51
IN THE AMERICAN COLONIES
82
VARIED DEVELOPMENT
106
CONSTITUTIONS
123
AMENDING THE ORGANIC LAW
144
FUNDAMENTALS AND THEIR FORCE
177
PLACES OR POPULATION
331
APPORTIONMENT UNDER THE UNION
356
DISTRICTS
380
CORRUPT PRACTICES IN ELECTIONS
405
THEORIES OF REPRESENTATION
434
INSTRUCTIONS IN CONGRESS
460
INDEPENDENCE v RESPONSIBILITY
492
THE RIGHT OF PETITION
514

REPRESENTATION
197
MAJORITY AND PLURALITY
220
MINORITIES
247
OCCUPATIONAL REPRESENTATION
269
FRANCHISE TESTS
287
THE SUFFRAGE
311
PUBLIC OPINION
535
THE INITIATIVE AND REFERENDUM
563
THE REFERENDUM
599
INDEX
637
Copyright

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Page 36 - The only way to erect such a common power as may be able to defend them from the invasion of foreigners and the injuries of one another, and thereby to secure them in such sort as that by their own industry and by the fruits of the earth they may nourish themselves and live contentedly...
Page 36 - ... confer all their power and strength upon one man, or upon one assembly of men, that may reduce all their wills by plurality of voices unto one will...
Page 40 - ... there can be but one supreme power, which is the legislative, to which all the rest are and must be subordinate, yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain ends, there remains still in the people a supreme power to remove or alter the legislative, when they find the legislative act contrary to the trust reposed in them.
Page 37 - God to which we owe under the immortal God, our peace and defence. For by this authority, given him by every particular man in the commonwealth, he hath the use of so much power and strength conferred on him, that by terror thereof, he is enabled to form the wills of them all to peace at home, and mutual aid against their enemies abroad.
Page 37 - I authorise and give up my right of governing myself, to this man, or to this assembly of men, on this condition, that thou give up thy right to him, and authorise all his actions in like manner.

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