Merrimack: Or, Life at the Loom; a Tale

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Redfield, 1854 - 353 pages
 

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Page 209 - In the woods too, a man casts off his years, as the snake his slough, and at what period soever of life, is always a child. In the woods is perpetual youth. Within these plantations of God, a decorum and sanctity reign, a perennial festival is dressed, and the guest sees not how he should tire of them in a thousand years. In the woods, we return to reason and faith.
Page 207 - OUR age is retrospective. It builds the sepulchres of the fathers. It writes biographies, histories, and criticism. The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. Why should not we also enjoy an original relation to the universe?
Page 209 - ... an angel might share. The long slender bars of cloud float like fishes in the sea of crimson light. From the earth, as a shore, I look out into that silent sea. I seem to partake its rapid transformations : the active enchantment reaches my dust, and I dilate and conspire with the morning wind.
Page 226 - For if the casting away of them be the reconciling of the world, what shall the receiving of them be, but life from the dead ? 16 For if the firstfruit be holy, the lump is also holy : and if the root be holy, so are the branches.
Page 210 - The world is emblematic. Parts of speech are metaphors, because the whole of nature is a metaphor of the human mind. The laws of moral nature answer to those of matter as face to face in a glass. "The visible world and the relation of its parts is the dial plate of the invisible.
Page 213 - Infancy is the perpetual Messiah, which comes into the arms of fallen men, and pleads with them to return to paradise.
Page 210 - How does Nature deify us with a few and cheap elements? Give me health and a day, and I will make the pomp of emperors ridiculous. The dawn is my Assyria; the sunset and moonrise my Paphos and unimaginable realms of faerie; broad noon shall be my England of the senses and understanding; the night shall be my Germany of mystic philosophy and dreams.
Page 259 - Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides. Come, and trip it as you go On the light fantastic toe...
Page 297 - There is a day of sunny rest For every dark and troubled night; And grief may bide an evening guest, But joy shall come with early light.
Page 209 - Standing on the bare ground,—my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite space,—all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eyeball; I am nothing ; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or particle of God.

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