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their happiness and welfare, and believe me, my dear Sir, with much regard,

Faithfully yours,

CHARLES SUMNER.

GEORGE H. HOYT, Esq., of the Committee, &c.

APPEAL TO THE REPUBLICANS OF RHODE ISLAND.

LETTER TO A COMMITTEE, SEPTEMBER 4, 1856.

DE

CRESSON, ALLEGHANY MOUNTAINS, PA.,
September 4, 1856.

EAR SIR, Were I well, I should regard your letter as a summons. But I am still in the hands of physicians, by whom I am carefully warned against all public effort. Most reluctantly, at this period of our country's trial, do I submit.

Accept for the Convention which will assemble at Providence my best wishes. Let it apply itself with earnestness, diligence, and singleness of purpose to the rescue of our fair land from the tyranny which now degrades it. Here is room for all, the aged and the young, the Conservative and the Reformer. Surely, Rhode Island, if not utterly disloyal to herself, if not utterly disloyal to New England civilization, if not utterly disloyal to the Republic of which she constitutes a part, will rise up as one man and insist that Kansas shall be secured to Liberty, and that the Slave Oligarchy shall be driven from its usurped foothold in the National Government. At all events, this State, first planted by the Author of Religious Freedom, will see that Human Rights do not suffer through the votes of her children.

Believe me, my dear Sir, faithfully yours,

CHARLES SUMNER.

CONTRIBUTION FOR KANSAS.

LETTER TO MESSRS. GREELEY AND MCELRATH, OF THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE, SEPTEMBER 23, 1856.

MESSRS. GREELEY AND MCELRATH:

HAVE watched with interest your generous fund

I HAVE watched Wible atton of Kousas, now in full

for the relief and liberation of Kansas, now insulted, trodden down, torn, and enslaved by the President of the United States, acting as the tool of the tyrannical Slave Oligarchy. To other funds for this important charity I have already given according to my small means; but, as a constant reader of the "Tribune," I cannot miss the opportunity which you afford to protest anew against an unparalleled Crime, and to contribute anew to its mitigation. Please to accept the check which I enclose for one hundred dollars. I wish it were more, when so much is needed.

Believe me, Gentlemen, your faithful servant,

CHARLES SUMNER.

PHILADELPHIA, September 23, 1856.

REGRET FOR CONTINUED DISABILITY.

LETTER TO HON. LEWIS D. CAMPBELL, OF OHIO, SEPTEMBER 24, 1856.

HAMILTON, Monday, September 29, 1856.

EDITORS OF THE CINCINNATI GAZETTE:

TENS of thousands of the Friends of Freedom were anxious to meet Senator Sumner at this place on Friday last. Many went away disappointed. I had assured the Committee of Arrangements, that, if the state of his health permitted, he would attend the meeting.

I have just received the enclosed private letter, which I venture to hand for publication, that those who were disappointed may understand and appreciate the cause of his non-attendance. It is in answer to a letter in which I urged Mr. Sumner to spend a fortnight in the Miami Valley for recreation, and to appear at the Hamilton meeting, even if his health should not permit him to speak.

MY

Very truly yours, &c.

LEWIS D. CAMPBELL.

PHILADELPHIA, Wednesday, September 24, 1856.

DEAR SIR, -Your letter of the 9th of Sep

tember, after travelling to Boston, at last found me here, where I am still detained under medical treatment, away from my home, which I have not visited since I left it at the beginning of the late session of Congress, now ten months ago.

With sorrow inexpressible, I am still constrained to all the care and reserve of an invalid. More than four months have passed since you clasped my hand as I tay bleeding at the Senate Chamber, and my system

is even now so far from the firmness of health that any departure from the prescribed rule is sure to occasion a relapse. I could not reach Ohio except by slow stages; and were I there, I should not have the sanction. of my physician in exposing myself to the excitements of a public meeting, even if I said nothing. This is hard, very hard, for me to bear; for I long to do something at this critical moment for the cause. What is life without action?

For a while, at least, I must leave to others the precious satisfaction of laboring for Liberty and the redemption of our country. But I have the comfort of knowing that never before was I so little needed.

God bless Ohio for her glorious testimony already, and her more glorious promises!

Believe me, my dear Sir, very faithfully yours,

CHARLES SUMNER.

HON. LEWIS D. CAMPBELL, Hamilton, Ohio.

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