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EFFECT OF A VOTE FOR BUCHANAN:

APPEAL TO THE REPUBLICANS OF ILLINOIS.

LETTER TO A COMMITTEE OF REPUBLICANS AT JOLIET,
OCTOBER 2, 1856.

THE local paper reports that this letter " was received with tremendous applause.

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PHILADELPHIA, October 2, 1856.

EAR SIR, I am sorry that I cannot be with the Republicans of Illinois at Joliet on the 8th of October, according to the invitation with which they have honored me; but inexorable, long-continued disability and the admonitions of medical skill keep me back still from all public effort, and even from return to my home, which I have not visited for more than ten months.

It is hard to renounce the opportunity which you offer me; for I have constantly hoped to visit Illinois during the present contest, and in plain language put to her people the questions which they are to decide by their votes. These are all involved in the Freedom of Kansas, but they are manifold in form.

Are you against the extension of Slavery? If yea, then vote for Fremont.

Are you especially against the extension of Slavery BY FORCE? If yea, then vote for Fremont.

Are you against the erection of the Slave Oligarchy as the dominant power in our Republic? If yea, then vote for Fremont.

Are you against the violation of the constitutional rights of American citizens? If yea, then vote for Fre

mont.

Audacious sophistry, often exposed, but still flaunting abroad, may seek to deceive you. It may foam with abuse and bristle with perversion of fact; but it cannot obscure the unquestionable truth, which now stares everybody in the face, that a vote for Buchanan is a vote for all these bad things. It is a vote not simply for the extension of Slavery, but also for the extension of Slavery BY FORCE, involving, besides, the erection of the Slave Oligarchy as the dominant power in our Republic, and the violation of the constitutional rights of American citizens. Surely, Illinois will not be led to sanction such enormities. Hers will be the path of Liberty, which is, of course, the path of true patriotism. Through her agency incalculable harm has already come to the Republic; but I cannot forget that she has begun a glorious reparation, by introducing to the National Councils a Senator of rare skill in debate, of sweetest purity of character, and of perfect loyalty to those principles by which Liberty will be secured, and our good name extended in history. I refer to Mr. Trumbull, who now belongs to the whole country, which is justly grateful for his eminent services. With his example before her, Illinois cannot wander again into the support of Slavery.

Give to the Republicans of Illinois my hearty Godspeed, and let my absence speak to them.

Ever faithfully yours,

To HON. J. O. NORTON.

CHARLES SUMNER.

APPEAL FOR THE REPUBLICAN CAUSE.

LETTER TO A COMMITTEE OF HUDSON RIVER COUNTIES, POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK, OCTOBER 3, 1856.

EAR SIR,

DE

PHILADELPHIA, October 3, 1856.

Among valued opportunities, which, by the dictation of my physician and the admonitions of continued ill-health, I am constrained to forego, is that afforded by the invitation, with which I have been honored, to meet the Republicans of the Hudson River Counties at Poughkeepsie. They will, I trust, believe me not indifferent to their kindness, or to the cause in whose name they are to assemble.

Nothing but necessity could keep me thus aloof, a mere looker-on, while the great battle of Freedom is waged. The pleasure of the sight to a spectator secure in the distance has been declared by an ancient poet in a much admired passage, reproduced by a greater modern :

"'Tis pleasant also to behold from far

The moving legions mingled in the war."

Yet the impulse and ardor of my convictions do not allow me to be content in any such retirement. I wish to enter the strife, and give such powers as I can to the righteous cause. But I am forbidden.

It only remains that from my retreat I should send all that for the present I can give, the prayers and benedictions of one yet too feeble for any exertion.

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While thus sitting apart, I am permitted to survey the field and to recognize the ensigns of triumph now streaming in the fresh northern breeze. Everywhere the people are aroused, at least away from the pavement of great cities, where, too often, human perversity is such as to suggest that "God made the country and man made the town."

Iowa, at the extreme West, and Maine, at the extreme East, testify to a sentiment which must prevail also in the intermediate States. In proper season New York and Pennsylvania will confess it. And this is natural; for the whole broad country has been shocked by the enormities of which Mr. Buchanan, in the pending contest, is the unflinching representative, and Mr. Fillmore the cautious, but effective, partisan.

In this contest I discern the masses of the people, under the name of the Republican party, together with good men regardless of ancient party ties, arrayed on the one side, while on the other side is the oligarchical combination of slave-masters, with the few Northern retainers they are yet able to keep, composed chiefly of sophists whose lives are involved in a spider's web of fine-spun excuses, hirelings whose personal convictions are all lost in salary, present or prospective, and trimmers whose eyes fail to discern present changes of opinion only because they are fastened too greedily upon ancient chances of preferment. Such are the parties.

And I discern clearly the precise question on which these parties are divided. In stating it I answer it.

The Territory of Kansas has been made the victim of countless atrocities, in order to force Slavery upon its beautiful, uncontaminated soil. By lawless violence.

a Government has been established there, which, after despoiling the citizen of all his dearest rights, has surrounded Slavery with the protection of pretended statutes. And the question is distinctly submitted to the American people, "Are you ready to sanction these enormities?" This is the simple question. The orators of Slavery, freely visiting Poughkeepsie, could not answer it, and therefore they have kept it out of sight. But there the question stands.

Refusing to become partakers of such wrong, you will contribute not only to the freedom of Kansas, but also to the overthrow of the brutal and domineering Oligarchy which seeks to enslave Kansas, simply as a stepping-stone to the enslavement of the whole country. Surely, no man can hesitate, when Freedom requires his vote. Nay, more, is not this cause worth living for? is not this cause worth dying for?

Accept my thanks for the special kindness of your communication, and my regrets that I can answer it only by this imperfect letter.

Believe me, dear Sir, ever faithfully yours,

CHARLES SUMNER,

STEPHEN BAKER, Esq.

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