The Playhouse and the Play, and Other Addresses Concerning the Theatre and Democracy in America

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Macmillan, 1909 - 210 pages
 

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Page 90 - Gentlemen, this confidence in the unsearched might of man belongs, by all motives, by all prophecy, by all preparation, to the American Scholar. We have listened too long to the courtly muses of Europe.
Page 90 - Young men of the fairest promise, who begin life upon our shores, inflated by the mountain winds, shined upon by all the stars of God, find the earth below not in unison with these, but are hindered from action by the disgust which the principles on which business is managed inspire, and turn drudges, or die of disgust, some of them 179
Page 89 - Perhaps the time is already come, when it ought to be, and will be, something else; when the sluggard intellect of this continent will look from under its iron lids, and fill the postponed expectation of the world with something better than the exertions of mechanical skill.
Page 89 - Our day of dependence, our long apprenticeship to the learning of other lands, draws to a close. The millions that around us are rushing into life, cannot always be fed on the sere remains of foreign harvests. Events, actions arise, that must be sung, that will sing themselves. Who can doubt that poetry will revive and lead in a new age, as the star in the constellation Harp, which now flames in our zenith, astronomers announce, shall one day be the pole-star for a thousand years?
Page 91 - We will walk on our own feet ; we will work with our own hands ; we will speak our own minds.
Page 90 - God, find the earth below not in unison with these, but are hindered from action by so the disgust which the principles on which business is managed inspire, and turn drudges, or die of disgust, some of them suicides. What is the remedy? They did not yet see, and thousands of young men as hopeful now crowding* to the barriers for the career do not yet see, that if the single man plant himself indomitably on his instincts, and there abide, the huge world will come 40 round to him.
Page 116 - Not a revival of old forms, not an emulation of Elizabethan blank verse, but a fresh imagining and an original utterance of modern motives which are as yet unimagined and unexpressed. Not a revival, but a new birth; not a restoration, but a renascence of poetic drama.
Page 17 - Theatre, is one that ought to be at least in every school in this country, and moreover I believe that it is going to be.

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