Lady Chesterfield's Letters to Her Daughter

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Houlston and Wright, 1860 - 235 pages
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Page 191 - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death ! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded ; what none hath dared, thou hast done ; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised ; thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hie jaeet ! Lastly, whereas this book, by the title it hath, calls itself The First Part of tlie General History of the World...
Page 55 - They parted — ne'er to meet again ! But never either found another To free the hollow heart from paining — They stood aloof, the scars remaining, Like cliffs which had been rent asunder ; A dreary sQajoow flows between. But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
Page 36 - ... only. I have encroached already too far on your valuable space — it would take nearly a whole number of ' N. & Q.' to give extracts from and reference to the books and illustrations bearing on the subject—and will conclude by quoting from 'Lady Chesterfield's Letters to her Daughter':— " I have worn skirts that dragged on the ground, and skirts that ended an inch above my ankles, and showing the vandyked or frilled edges of those comfortable garments we have borrowed from the other BOX,...
Page 25 - And lovers' songs shall turn to holy psalms : A man at arms must now sit on his knees, And feed on prayers that are old age's alms. And so from court to cottage I depart : My saint is sure of mine unspotted heart.
Page 109 - Anne's lane, but was called a prick-eared cur for his pains, and, instead of being shown the way, was told, that she had been a saint before he was born, and would be one after he was hanged. Upon this...
Page 109 - Popish cur and asked him who had made Anne a saint? The boy, being in some confusion, inquired of the next he met, which was the way to Anne's lane, but was called a prick-eared cur for his pains, and, instead...
Page 25 - My helmet now shall make a hive for bees, And lovers' songs shall turn to holy psalms; A man-at-arms must now sit on his knees, And feed...
Page 200 - ... more repugnant to any of us, than the study of grammar ; and when, after many a good caning, we had at last, in some fashion, mastered its rules, our estimate of their value was not very different from the charity boy's estimate of the value of the alphabet which he had just learnt ; — we questioned whether it was worth while going through so much to learn so little.
Page 5 - An old lion, among other precepts that he gave his son, charged him that he should never fight with a Man; because, if he was not too strong, he would, at least, be too crafty. The young lion heard him, but regarded him not...
Page 38 - Venus visited Paris — she died there, I believe, poor over-fed creature— and there received the cachet of the Archpriestesses of fashion. The bustle was, if not invented, at least re-discovered, and soon obtained astonishing vogue. It was at first a species of pillow-roll, or pudding, stuffed and covered, and secured round the waist with strings. Of...

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