Annual Report, Volume 2

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1899
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Page 65 - Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How they built their nests in summer, Where they hid themselves in winter, Talked with them whene'er he met them, Called them "Hiawatha's chickens.
Page 473 - June 30, 1896; that we have found the same well kept and classified as above, and that the receipts for the year from the treasurer of the United States are shown to have been...
Page 8 - ... and chipping-sparrows explore every tree in the old orchard. If the birds want to live with us, we should encourage them. The first thing to do is to let them alone. Let them be as free from danger and fear as you or I. Take the hammer off the old gun, give pussy so much to eat that she will not care to hunt for birds, and keep away the boys who steal eggs and who carry sling-shots and throw stones. Plant trees and bushes about the borders of the place, and let some of them, at least, grow into...
Page 299 - Cigar-Case-Bearer, 20 pp. 97 Entomogenous Fungi, 42 pp. 101 The Spraying of Trees and the Canker Worm, 24 pp. 102 General Observations in Care of Fruit Trees, 26 pp. 103 Soil Depletion in Respect to the Care of Fruit Trees, 21 pp. 109 Geological History of the Chautauqua Grape Belt, 36 pp. 110 Extension Work in Horticulture, 42 pp.
Page 374 - BOARD OF CONTROL: THE TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY. THE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE AND STATION COUNCIL. JACOB GOULD SCHURMAN. President of the University. FRANKLIN C. CORNELL, Trustee of the University.
Page 7 - ... since October. The birds remember the old places. The wrens pull the sticks from the old hollow rail and seem to be wild with joy to see the place again. They must be the same wrens that were here last year and the year before, for strangers could not make so much fuss over an old rail.
Page 302 - ... LIBERTY H. BAILEY, Professor of Horticulture. JOHN H. COMSTOCK, Professor of Entomology. STATION AND UNIVERSITY EXTENSION STAFF. IP ROBERTS, Agriculture. GC CALDWELL, Chemistry. JAMES LAW, Veterinary Science. JH COMSTOCK, Entomology. LH BAILEY, Horticulture, Nature-Study. HH WING, Dairy Husbandry. GF ATKINSON, Botany.
Page 219 - York, 28 pp. 134 Strawberries under Glass, 10 pp. 135 Forage Crops, 28 pp. 136 Chrysanthemums, 24 pp. 137 Agricultural Extension Work, sketch of its Origin and Progress, 11 pp. 138 Studies and Illustrations of Mushrooms: I. 32 pp. 139 Third Report upon Japanese...
Page 12 - Girdler and the Raspberry-Cane Maggot. 127. A Second Account of Sweet Peas. 128. A Talk about Dahlias. 129. How to Conduct Field Experiments with Fertilizers. 130. Potato Culture. 131. Notes upon Plums for Western New York.
Page 97 - But our breeding experiments and what little definite evidence there is on this point, indicate that the majority of the moths do not emerge until several days after the petals have fallen. Then allowing a few days for the preparation for oviposition. we should not expect, and, in fact, do not find eggs until a week or more after the petals drop. Another week must elapse before the eggs hatch, so that, theoretically, we should find but few worms until after the blossoms have been off for two weeks...

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