Everybody Ahead: Or, Getting the Most Out of Life

Front Cover
F. E. Morrison, 1916 - 535 pages
 

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Contents

I
II
22
III
42
IV
51
V
71
VI
102
VII
114
VIII
134
XVIII
297
XIX
308
XX
322
XXI
342
XXII
358
XXIII
374
XXIV
378
XXV
396

IX
158
X
172
XI
197
XII
214
XIII
227
XIV
248
XV
261
XVI
275
XVII
287
XXVI
412
XXVII
429
XXVIII
444
XXIX
457
XXX
485
XXXI
496
XXXII
506
XXXIII
521
Copyright

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Page 271 - If a m'an can write a better book, preach a better sermon, or make a better mouse-trap than his neighbor, though he build his house in the woods, the world will make a beaten path to his door.
Page 223 - Who breaks his birth's invidious bar, And grasps the skirts of happy chance, • And breasts the blows of circumstance. And grapples with his evil star ; Who makes by force his merit known And lives to clutch the golden keys. To mould a mighty state's decrees, And shape the whisper of the throne ; And moving up from high to higher, Becomes on Fortune's crowning slope The pillar of a people's hope...
Page 360 - Somebody said that it couldn't be done, But he with a chuckle replied That " maybe it couldn't," but he would be one Who wouldn't say so till he'd tried. So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin On his face. If he worried he hid it. He started to sing as he tackled the thing That couldn't be done, and he did it. Somebody scoffed: "Oh, you'll never do that; At least no one ever has done it...
Page 226 - Give a boy address and accomplishments, and you give him the mastery of palaces and fortunes where he goes. He has not the trouble of earning or owning them; they solicit him to enter and possess.
Page 293 - If this life be not a real fight, in which something is eternally gained for the universe by success, it is no better than a game of private theatricals from which one may withdraw at will. But it feels like a real fight, — as if there were something really wild in the universe which we, with all our idealities and faithfulnesses, are needed to redeem ; and first of all to redeem our own hearts from atheisms and fears.
Page 375 - Well! he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it; but it is being counted none the less. Down among his nerve-cells and fibres the molecules are counting it, registering and storing it up to be used against him when the next temptation comes.
Page 463 - Perhaps the most valuable result of all education is the ability to make yourself do the thing you have to do, when it ought to be done, whether you like it or not ; it is the first lesson that ought to be learned ; and, however early a man's training begins, it is probably the last lesson that he learns thoroughly.
Page 217 - As well," shouted the Spaniards, derisively, to the citizens, " as well can the Prince of Orange pluck the stars from the sky as bring the ocean to the walls of Leyden for your relief.
Page 372 - Seize the very first possible opportunity to act on every resolution you make and on every emotional prompting you may experience in the direction of the habits you aspire to gain. It is not in the moment of their forming, but in the moment of their producing motor effects, that resolves and aspirations communicate the new " set
Page 372 - The great thing, then, in all education, is to make our nervous system our ally instead of our enemy. It is to fund and capitalize our acquisitions, and live at ease upon the interest of the fund. For this we must make automatic and habitual, as early as possible, as many useful actions as we can, and guard against the growing into ways that are likely to be disadvantageous to us, as we should guard against the plague.

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