The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science

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Taylor & Francis, 1846
 

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Page 322 - Mr. Cornelius heated one end of a piece of thick plated copper to nearly the melting point of the metal; the silver at this end disappeared, and when the metal was cleaned by a solution of dilute sulphuric acid, the end which had been heated presented a uniform surface of copper, whilst the other end exhibited its proper coating of silver. The unsilvered end of the plate was next placed, for a few minutes, in a solution of muriate of zinc, by which the exterior surface of copper was removed, and...
Page 325 - The point intended to be set forth for the consideration of the hearers was, whether it was not possible that the vibrations which in a certain theory are assumed to account for radiation and radiant phenomena may not occur...
Page 142 - All matter appears to be subject to the magnetic force as universally as it is to the gravitating, the electric and the chemical or cohesive forces...
Page 458 - to shew that I do not take gravity for an essential property of bodies, I have added one question concerning its cause, choosing to propose it by way of a question, because I am not yet satisfied about it for want of experiments.
Page 519 - This twisting displacement, at first appears to indicate a vorticose movement beneath each point thus affected; but this is highly improbable. May it not be caused by a tendency in each stone to arrange itself in some particular position, with respect to the lines of vibration,— in a manner somewhat similar to pins on a sheet of paper when shaken?
Page 325 - You are aware of the speculation* which I some time since uttered respecting that view of the nature of matter which considers its ultimate atoms as centres of force, and not as so many little bodies surrounded by forces, the bodies being considered in the abstract as independent of the forces and capable of existing without them. In the latter view, these little particles have a definite form and a certain limited size ; in the former view such is not the case, for that which represents size may...
Page 469 - ... of those, that went in his ship, he would by unstopping a vessel full of this liquor, speedily restore to the troubled air such a proportion of vital parts, as would make it again, for a good while, fit for respiration...
Page 294 - ... shows that the magnetic force and the light have a direct relation : but that substances are necessary, and that these act in different degrees, shows that the magnetism and the light act on each other through the intervention of the matter.
Page 139 - One of the simplest forms of experiment in which the operation of this newly-discovered law of magnetic action is manifested, is the following : — A bar of glass, composed of silicated borate of lead, two inches in length, and half an inch in width and in thickness, is suspended at its centre by a long thread, formed of several fibres of silk cocoon, so as to turn freely, by the slightest force, in a horizontal plane, and is secured from the agitation of currents of air by being enclosed in a glass...
Page 294 - But it does not make them magnets (2171.), and therefore the molecular condition of these bodies, when in the state described, must be specifically distinct from that of magnetized iron, or other such matter, and must be a new magnetic condition; and as the condition is a state of tension (manifested by its instantaneous return to the normal state when the magnetic induction is removed), so the force which the matter in this state possesses and its mode of action, must be to us a new magnetic force...

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