Works, Volume 5

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Houghton Mifflin, 1884
 

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Page 228 - That it be a receptacle for all such profitable observations and axioms as fall not within the compass of any of the special parts of philosophy or sciences, but are more common and of a higher stage.
Page 214 - And one traces this Jewish prayer in all English private history, from the prayers of King Richard, in Richard of Devizes' Chronicle, to those in the diaries of Sir Samuel Romilly and of Haydon the painter. "Abroad with my wife...
Page 108 - Neither high-born nobleman, knight, nor esquire was here ; but many of these humble sons of the hills had a consciousness that the land, which they walked over and tilled, had for more than five hundred years been possessed by men of their name and blood...
Page 10 - Here is my theory of structure : A scientific arrangement of spaces and forms to functions and to site ; an emphasis of features proportioned to their gradated importance in function ; color and ornament to be decided and arranged and varied by strictly organic laws, having a distinct reason for each decision ; the entire and immediate banishment of all make-shift and makebelieve.
Page 69 - The English delight in the antagonism which combines in one person the extremes of courage and tenderness. Nelson, dying at Trafalgar, sends his love to Lord Collingwood, and, like an innocent school-boy that goes to bed, says, " Kiss me, Hardy,
Page 228 - ... if any man think philosophy and universality to be idle studies, he doth not consider that all professions are from thence served and supplied.
Page 294 - That which lures a solitary American in the woods with the wish to see England, is the moral peculiarity of the Saxon race,— its commanding sense of right and wrong...
Page 170 - Lane; in whose house there was oftentimes six oxen eaten at a breakfast, and every tavern was full of his meat: for he that had any acquaintance in that house might have there so much of sodden and roast meat as he could prick and carry upon a long dagger.
Page 141 - Scotch are much handsomer; and that the English are great lovers of themselves, and of everything belonging to them; they think that there are no other men than themselves, and no other world but England; and whenever they see a handsome foreigner, they say that 'he looks like an Englishman...
Page 86 - ... displayed itself; and it instantly struck him that where there was room for an enemy's ship to swing there was room for one of ours to anchor. The plan which he intended to pursue, therefore, was to keep entirely on the outer side of the French line, and station his ships, as far as he was able, one on the outer bow and another on the outer quarter of each of the enemy's. Captain Berry, when he comprehended the scope of the design, exclaimed with transport, " If we succeed, what will the world...

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