Sermons by Unitarian Ministers: Second series

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Philip Green, 1906 - 136 pages
 

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Page 15 - And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner.
Page 117 - And there are diversities of workings, but the same God, who worketh all things in all.
Page 33 - Over-soul, within which every man's particular being is contained and made one with all other; that common heart of which all sincere conversation is the -worship, to which all right action is submission; that overpowering reality which confutes our tricks and talents, and constrains every one to pass for what he is, and to speak from his character and not from his tongue, and which evermore tends to pass into our thought and hand and become wisdom and virtue and power and beauty.
Page 34 - God comes to see us without bell"; that is, as there is no screen or ceiling between our heads and the infinite heavens, so is there no bar or wall in the soul where man, the effect, ceases, and God, the cause, begins. The walls are taken away. We lie open on one side to the deeps of spiritual nature, to the attributes of God.
Page 70 - They only the victory win Who have fought the good fight and have vanquished the demon that tempts us within; Who have held to their faith unseduced by the prize that the world holds on high; Who have dared for a high cause to suffer, resist, fight — if need be, to die.
Page 95 - For the love of God is broader Than the measures of man's mind, And the heart of the Eternal Is most wonderfully kind...
Page 33 - Ineffable is the union of man and God in every act of the soul. The simplest person, who in his integrity worships God, becomes God; yet for ever and ever the influx of this better and universal self is new and unsearchable.
Page 132 - Truly the light is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is for the eyes to behold the sun...
Page 25 - Countrymen, My heart doth joy that yet, in all my life, I found no man but he was true to me. I shall have glory by this losing day, More than Octavius and Mark Antony By this vile conquest shall attain unto. So fare you well at once; for Brutus...
Page 33 - We grant that human life is mean, but how did we find out that it was mean ? ' What is the ground of this uneasiness of ours; of this old discontent? What is the universal sense of want and ignorance, but the fine innuendo by which the soul makes its enormous claim...

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