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fifteen institutions for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1905, was $14,208.24 as compared with $16.123.20, a decrease of $1,914.96, while the average per capita expenditure was $1.72 as compared with $1.93, a decrease of 21 cents. The only institutions where there was any marked fluctuation in the expenditures were Elmira and Syracuse. At Elmira the total expenditure for hospital and medical supplies was $1,147.69 as compared with $2,768.48, a decrease of $1,620.79, while the per capita expenditure was 89 cents as compared with $2, a decrease of $1.11. This is accounted for by the diptheria epidemic which prevailed at Elmira during the preceding fiscal year, greatly increasing the expenditure for that year. The year just closed indicates normal conditions. At Syracuse the total expenditure was $908.08 as compared with $672.39, an increase of $235.69, and a per capita increase of 43 cents. Near the close of the fiscal year Syracuse had an epidemic of typhoid, part of the extra cost of which is shown in the expenditure for hospital and medical supplies.

The total expenditures under shop, farm and garden for the fifteen institutions during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1905, was $57,668.85 as compared with $58,509.65, a decrease of $840.80, while the average per capita expenditure was $6.96 as compared with $6.98, a decrease of two cents. This decrease in the total expenditure and in the per capita expenditure indicates very little fluctuation in the average expenditure under this head.

The total expenditure for ordinary repairs at the fifteen institutions for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1905, was $5,234.15 as compared with $6,556.79, a decrease of $1,322.64, while the average per capita expenditure was 63 cents as compared with 78 cents, a decrease of 15 cents. The expenditures

for ordinary repairs have been decreasing steadily since the creation of this Department, as it is the policy to provide for all necessary repairs, improvements and betterments, so far as possible, by a special appropriation each year under repairs and equipment. As a result of this policy several of the institutions this year have no expenditures at all for ordinary repairs, while the highest per capita expenditure at any institution was $1.69 at Sonyea.

The total expenditure of the fifteen institutions for the transportation of inmates for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1905, was $28,543.94 as compared with $25,014.10 for the preceding year, an increase of $3,529.84. This item is one over

which the institutions and this Department have no control, as it depends entirely upon the number of inmates transported and the distance traveled.

The total expenditure of the fifteen institutions for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1905, under miscellaneous, was $47,447.06 as compared with $45,846.78, an increase of $1,600.28, while the average per capita expenditure was $5,73 as compared with $5.47, an increase of 26 cents.

At Albion the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $2,209.88 as compared with $1,799.38, an increase of $410.50, while the per capita expenditure was $11.89, as compared with $12.44, a decrease of 55 cents.

At Batavia the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $1,284.62 as compared with $1,419.25, a decrease of $134.63, while the per capita expenditure was $9.39 as compared with $11.14, a decrease of $1.75.

At Bath the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $6,260.43 as compared with $6,076.12, an increase of $184.31,

while the per capita expenditure was $3.45 as compared with $3.40, an increase of 5 cents.

At Bedford the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $1,705.18 as compared with $1,337.25, an increase of $367.93, while the per capita expenditure was $7.533 as compared with $6.33, an increase of $1.20.

At Elmira the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $5.767.95 as compared with $5,528.30, an increase of $239.65, while the per capita expenditure was $4.45 as compared with $3.98, an increase of 47 cents.

At Hudson the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $2,854.20 as compared with $2,737.57, an increase of $116.63, while the per capita expenditure was $15.50 as compared with $16.33, a decrease of 83 cents.

At Iroques the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $1,659.91 as compared with $1,439.02, an increase of $220.89, while the per capita expenditure was $10.35 as compared with $9.27, and increase of $1.08.

At Newark the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $2,492 59 as compared with $2,788.11, a decrease of $295.52, while the per capita expenditure was $4.45 as compared with $5.24, a decrease of 79 cents.

At Oxford the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $539.59 as compared with $801.78, a decrease of $262.19, while the per capita expenditure was $3.63 as compared with $5.61, a decrease of $1.98.

At Randall's Island the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $3,701.86 as compared with $3,353.70, an increase of $348.16, while the per capita expenditure was $5.26 as compared with $3.88, an increase of $1.38.

At Rochester the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $7,826.16 as compared with $7,869.22, a decrease of $43.06, while the per capita expenditure was $12.85 as compared with $9.68, an increase of $3.17.

At Rome the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $2,323.47 as compared with $2,023.48, an increase of $299.99, while the per capita expenditure was $3.24 as compared with $2.96, an increase of 28 cents.

At Sonyea the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $4,124.16 as compared with $3,645.46, an increase of $178.70, while the per capita expenditure was $4.16 as compared with $4.36, a decrease of 20 cents.

At Syracuse the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $2,892.39 as compared with $2,804.58, an increase of $87.81, while the per capita expenditure was $5.58 as compared with $5.51, an increase of 7 cents.

At West Haverstraw the total expenditure under miscellaneous was $1,804.67 as compared with $2,223.56, a decrease of $418.89, while the per capita expenditure was $60.72 as compared with $88.24, a decrease of $27.52.

FUEL SAVING DEVICES.

In my report to the Legislature two years ago I referred to the installation of fuel-saving device under the boilers at the House of Refuge for Women at Hudson (now the New York State Training School for Girls), and stated: "The saving that will be effected by the installation of forced draft will be over $1,000, and if at the end of the winter of 1903-1904 this percentage is kept up, it will be my endeavor to equip several of the heating plants throughout the State with similar devices."

This percentage was more than kept up. The total quantity of coal used in the boiler-room during the year ending September 30, 1904, was 1,490 tons, and the cost $3,851.46 as compared with 1,717 tons, 1.300 weight, at a total cost of $10,160.26, for the preceding year showing a saving of over 12 per cent. in the quantity of coal and a saving of over 60 per cent. in the cost of coal, which more than met expectations and confirmed me in the belief that similar devices could be installed at some of the other institutions greatly to the profit of the State.

The year prior to the installation of the system of forced draft under the boilers at Hudson that institution had been burning soft coal, which led to frequent complaints on account of the deposits of soot from the dense black smoke upon clothing and about the buildings.

Last year the size of the coal bill at the New York State Soldiers' and Sailors' Home at Bath drew my attention to that institution as one in which fuel-saving devices could be used to advantage. The home was using anthracite pea coal, for which it paid during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1904, $4.25 a ton during the first six months of the year, $3.75 a ton in April and $3.90 a ton in May, June, July, August and September. The total consumption of pea coal for the fiscal year was 7,927.05 gross tons and the cost was $32,708.99.

I believed that a saving of several thousand dollars over and above the cost of fuel-saving device could be made in one year at this institution if some system could be installed that would burn the lower grades of anthracite- and bituminous coal. A brief minute giving a rough estimate of the probable saving was prepared for the consideration of the finance committee and the ways and means committee, and an item was inserted in the

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