The English household magazine, Volume 3

Front Cover
1882

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Page 188 - It is the little rift within the lute, That by and by will make the music mute, And ever widening slowly silence all.
Page 189 - I weigh'd thy heart with one Too wholly true to dream untruth in thee. Made my tears burn — is also past — in part. And all is past, the sin is sinn'd and I, Lo ! I forgive thee, as Eternal God Forgives : do thou for thine own soul the rest.
Page 110 - Why do they prate of the blessings of Peace? we have made them a curse, Pickpockets, each hand lusting for all that is not its own; And lust of gain, in the spirit of Cain, is it better or worse Than the heart of the citizen hissing in war on his own hearthstone?
Page 111 - Queen rose of the rosebud garden of girls, Come hither, the dances are done, In gloss of satin and glimmer of pearls, Queen lily and rose in one; Shine out, little head, sunning over with curls, To the flowers, and be their sun.
Page 189 - Let no man dream but that I love thee still. Perchance, and so thou purify thy soul, And so thou lean on our fair father Christ, Hereafter in that world where all are pure We two may meet before high God, and thou Wilt spring to me, and claim me thine, and know I am thine husband — not a smaller soul, Nor Lancelot, nor another. Leave me that, I charge thee, my last hope. Now must I hence. Thro...
Page 110 - Ah God, for a man with heart, head, hand, Like some of the simple great ones gone For ever and ever by, One still strong man in a blatant land, Whatever they call him, what care I, Aristocrat, democrat, autocrat — one Who can rule and dare not lie.
Page 90 - And only thro' the faded leaf The chestnut pattering to the ground; Calm and deep peace on this high wold, And on these dews that drench the furze, And all the silvery gossamers That twinkle into green and gold; Calm and still light on yon great plain That sweeps with all its autumn bowers, And crowded farms and lessening towers, To mingle with the bounding main; Calm and deep peace in this wide air, These leaves that redden to the fall...
Page 90 - Nor thro' the questions men may try, The petty cobwebs we have spun : If e'er when faith had fall'n asleep, I heard a voice 'believe no more,' And heard an ever-breaking shore That tumbled in the Godless deep; A warmth within the breast would melt The freezing reason's colder part, And like a man in wrath the heart Stood up and answered, 'I have felt.
Page 220 - That coil'd around the stately stems and ran Ev'n to the limit of the land, the glows And glories of the broad belt of the world, All these he saw ; but what he fain had seen He could not see, the kindly human...
Page 220 - All these he saw ; but what he fain had seen He could not see, the kindly human face Nor ever hear a kindly voice, but heard The myriad shriek of...

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