A Collection of Archaeological Pamphlets on Roman Remains Formed by Sir B.C.A. Windle and Relating Principally to Great Britain, Volume 2

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Page 16 - There bark'd the wolf, and dire hyaenas fed. Yet midst her towery fanes, in ruin laid, The pilgrim saint his murmuring vespers paid ; 'Twas his to climb the tufted rocks, and rove The chequer'd twilight of the olive grove ; 'Twas his to bend beneath the sacred gloom, And wear with many a kiss Messiah's tomb...
Page 123 - Mrs. Hicks and her daughter, aged nine, were hanged at Huntingdon for selling their souls to the devil, and raising a storm by pulling off their stockings and making a lather of soap...
Page 204 - Out upon Time ! it will leave no more Of the things to come than the things before ! Out upon Time! who for ever will leave But enough of the past for the future to grieve O'er that which hath been, and o'er that which must be!
Page 90 - Persian; and it is possible, that the words Dipuc and Cupid, which have the same signification, may have the same origin ; since we know, that the old Hetruscans, from whom great part of the Roman language and religion was derived, and whose system had a near affinity -with that of the Perfians and Indians, used to write their lines alternately forwards and backwards, as furrows are made by the plough...
Page 106 - The ploughman, supposing it to have been hid treasure, sent for the Abbot to see it taken up. The mouth of the pot was closed with a white substance like paste or clay, as hard as burnt brick; and, when that was removed, another pot enclosed a third, which would hold about a gallon, and this...
Page 101 - ... It would seem that their parents had done all in their power, by providing them with nourishment, to soothe them, and stop the crying, which Virgil, in the narrative of the descent of ./Eneas to Hades, in the 6th book of the ^Eneid, mentions thus : — " Vagitus et ingens, Infantumque animoj fleutes in limine primo.
Page 39 - Holly-tree properties adjoin — was very massive and broad. Composed of flints, septaria, and a dense mortar, harder, even now, than the stony part, it was laid upon a flat surface of sand, well rammed and beaten. First upon this sand some mortar was spread, then large flints and septaria, then more mortar was added, and about two feet and a half of this irregular work was perfected. The first course of tiles was laid upon the foundation, and every attention paid to its being perfectly level. The...
Page 29 - ... calling them by the opprobrious names of slaves and captives, added insult to their tyranny. In these acts of oppression, the veterans were supported by the common soldiers ; a set of men, by their habits of life, trained to licentiousness, and, in their turn, expecting to reap the same advantages. The temple built in honour of Claudius was another cause of discontent. In the eye of the Britons it seemed the citadel of eternal slavery. The priests, appointed to officiate at the altars, with a...

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