The Sanitary conditions and necessities of school-houses and school life

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Republican Press Association, 1886 - 38 pages
 

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Page 3 - The Preventable Causes of Disease, Injury, and Death in American Manufactories and Workshops, and the Best Means and Appliances for Preventing and Avoiding Them.
Page 11 - The provisions for ventilation should be such as to provide for each person in a class-room not less than thirty cubic feet of fresh air per minute, which amount must be introduced and thoroughly distributed without creating unpleasant draughts or causing any two parts of the room to differ in temperature more than 2° F., or the maximum temperature to exceed 70° F.
Page 30 - Frequent rest by looking up. 12. Distance of book from the eye about fifteen inches. As regards the causes. No. 2 refers especially to the case of convalescents after measles, scarlet fever and other weakening fevers. No. 6 requires attention on account of some suggestive remarks made by Dr. Loring in the report referred to. He enlarges on...
Page 3 - I. HEALTHY HOMES AND FOODS FOR THE WORKING CLASSES. By VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, MD, PH. D., Professor in University of Michigan. Prize, . . $200 II. THE SANITARY CONDITIONS AND NECESSITIES OF SCHOOL-HOUSES AND SCHOOL-LIFE. By DF LINCOLN, MD, Boston, Mass. Prize, . . . $200 III. DISINFECTION AND INDIVIDUAL PROPHYLAXIS AGAINST INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
Page 3 - ... among the people. Although a copyright has been placed upon these essays for legitimate protection, permission to publish under certain conditions can be obtained by addressing the secretary. We commend this volume to the public, believing it to be an unequaled work upon " Practical Sanitary and Economic Cooking, adapted to persons of moderate and small means.
Page 14 - This estimate, however, is admissible only on the supposition that the ventilation is efficient. In case of defect, or apprehended defect (and this covers a wide ground), the young children should have equal room with the older ones, on the ground of their comparative inability to cope with the deleterious effects of bad air ; also, because in contracted quarters the danger of draughts from windows is greater. It has been said that children need a proportionately large allowance, " because metamorphosis...
Page 10 - ... smoke, which is so apt to cause panic. To this end, it is proposed, by the chief engineer of one of our large cities, to have a large valve, easily opened, at the roof, so as to draw out great quantities of air or smoke. There may be also extra flues, built in the partition walls, communicating with such floor spaces or wainscot spaces as may be supposed likely to be the seat of fire. The flues will not afford a supply of air to the flame, but will only carry off" the smoke and gases instead...

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