FOOT NOTES FOR WALKING AS A FINE ART

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Page 37 - Old Floyd Ireson, for his hard heart, Tarred and feathered and carried in a cart By the women of Marblehead!
Page 262 - Is Franklin the only man who is lost, that his wife should be so earnest to find him? Does Mr. Grinnell know where he himself is?
Page 29 - A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind -- from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts ; they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty.
Page 51 - The greater part are of no known use ; but some, as the reindeer moss (Cenomycc rangifcrina), the Iceland moss (Cetraria islandicti), iiud various species of Gyrophora, are capable of sustaining life, either in animals or man. The Iceland moss, when deprived of its bitterness by boiling, becomes, indeed, a diet recommended to invalids. Others are used as tonic medicines, as Variolaria faginea, and Parmelia parietina. Their principal use is, however, that of furnishing the dyer with brilliant colours...
Page 41 - I left him in the house, on which he became very boisterous, attempting to pilfer some things, which my domestic discovered ; finally carried off a brass save-all, of a stand of candle-sticks (then undiscovered); what else is at present unknown. This, though trifling in its value, intrinsically, but as an ancient patrimonial legacy of high estimation, not only is a standing evidence of their prudent economy, but ex vi termini a memento to economy to save-all.
Page 171 - ... of Mr. as Mr. Desborow, &c. while according to the plain customs of those times the commonalty were named only Goodman or Neighbour, such or such an one. How greatly are times now changed ? Every man almost is called Mr. every woman, Miss, Madam, or Lady. Popularity destroys all civil distinction. " The first planters, whether Gentlemen or Yeomen, were almost all of them husbandmen by profession...
Page 171 - Popularity destroys all civil distinction. " The first planters, whether Gentlemen or Yeomen, were almost all of them husbandmen by profession : few tradesmen ; not one blacksmith among them ; it was with great cost the town obtained one to live among them. In this respect they were quite different from the first settlers of New Haven, although they came with them. The good people who came with Mr. Davenport were Londoners, bred to merchandise, and fixed upon a place proper for trading, which was...
Page 40 - I flatter myself the subsequent succinct account will be forgiven. As economy is the watchword of this reign, as candor was of the former, in the courtly .and ministerial style, it has crossed the Atlantic, and is in high vogue in America as well as Westminster, the city of the great King. The story is this : A few days since, a strolling man in soldier's regimental garb, calling himself James McCannon, with a blazing woman, came into my house in early morn, begged for cider...
Page 2 - The tendre croppes and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne, And smale fowles maken...
Page 58 - I think I may say something about my relations to the lichens, for I have lived somewhat intimately with them. I am a pruner ; and the practical man who employs me is vigilant against the insects that prey on the fruit and shelter themselves on the trees. I must be executive and not maunder ; so I labor along diligently scraping...

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