Emerson and Self-reliance

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2002 - 221 pages
This reprint is distinguished by a new preface reconsidering Emerson's Nature, a work that goes undiscussed in the text proper (Kateb moves toward the notion that Emerson's divinization of humanity renders the balance with nature lost, "its mute appeal denied"). Nonetheless, Kateb (politics, Princeton U.) views Emerson as a radical for his commitment to individualism as an ideal suitable for democracy. Emerson calls it "self-reliance" and Kateb distinguishes between the mental and active kinds, suggesting Emerson elevates intellectual independence above independence of character and practical achievement. Nietzsche is held up as Emerson's best reader, Kateb aspiring to a reading of Emerson friendly to Nietzsche's interests. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
 

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Contents

SelfReliance and the Life of the Mind
1
Redeeming the Frustrations of Experience
37
The Question of Religiousness
61
Friendship and Love
96
Individuality and Identity
134
SelfReliance Politics and Society
173
Conclusion
197
Bibliography
203
Index
206
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

George Kateb is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University.

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