Saint Ignatius Loyola: The Pilgrim Years 1491-1538

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Farrar, Straus and Cudahy, 1956 - 373 pages
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Page 188 - My intention being to acquire the habitude of all these virtues, I judged it would be well not to distract my attention by attempting the whole at once but to fix it on one of them at a time, and when I should be master of that, then to proceed to another, and so on till I should have gone through the thirteen.
Page 188 - ... line with the first letter of one of the virtues; on which line, and in its proper column, I might mark by a little black spot every fault I found upon examination to have been committed respecting that virtue, upon that day.1 1 determined to give a week's strict attention to each of the virtues successively.
Page 188 - I made a little book, in which I allotted a page for each of the virtues. I rul'd each page with red ink, so as to have seven columns, one for each day of the week, marking each column with a letter for the day.
Page 187 - Providence ; that the most acceptable service of God was the doing good to man ; that our souls are immortal ; and that all crime will be punished, and virtue rewarded, either here or hereafter.
Page 188 - And to this habit (after my character of integrity) I think it principally owing that I had early so much weight with my fellowcitizens when I proposed new institutions, or alterations in the old, and so much influence in public councils when I became a member ; for I was but a bad speaker, never eloquent, subject to much hesitation in my choice of words, hardly correct in language, and yet I generally carried my points.
Page 48 - Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Page 188 - In reality, there is, perhaps, no one of our natural passions so hard to subdue as pride. Disguise it, struggle with it, beat it down, stifle it, mortify it as much as one pleases, it is still alive, and will every now and then peep out and show itself ; you will see it, perhaps, often in this history ; for, even if I could conceive that I had completely overcome it, I should probably be proud of my humility.
Page 190 - ... desired to have the whole of its surface as bright as the edge. The smith consented to grind it bright for him if he would turn the wheel; he turned, while the smith pressed the broad face of the ax hard and heavily on the stone, which made the turning of it very fatiguing.
Page 188 - I could go through a course complete in thirteen weeks, and four courses in a year. And like him who, having a garden to weed, does not attempt to eradicate all the bad herbs at once, which would exceed his reach and his strength, but works on one of the beds at a time, and, having...
Page 334 - For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood ; but against principalities and powers, against the rulers of the world of this darkness, against the spirits of wickedness in the high places.

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