Scientific transcendentalism, by D.M.

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Williams & Norgate, 1880 - 113 pages
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Page 85 - Vates means both Prophet and Poet : and indeed at all times, Prophet and Poet, well understood, have much kindred of meaning. Fundamentally indeed they are still the same ; in this most important respect especially, That they have penetrated both of them into the sacred mystery of the Universe ; what Goethe calls
Page 86 - The world is emblematic. Parts of speech are metaphors, because the whole of nature is a metaphor of the human mind. The laws of moral nature answer to those of matter as face to face in a glass. "The visible world and the relation of its parts, is the dial plate of the invisible.
Page 30 - Wise men have said are wearisome; who reads Incessantly, and to his reading brings not A spirit and judgment equal or superior (And what he brings, what needs he elsewhere seek) Uncertain and unsettled still remains, Deep versed in books and shallow in himself, Crude or intoxicate, collecting toys, And trifles for choice matters, worth a sponge; As children gathering pebbles on the shore.
Page 90 - Yea, mine own familiar friend, in whom I trusted, which did eat of my bread, hath lifted up his heel against me.
Page 38 - ... towards the original of all our notions and knowledge, if we remark how great a dependence our words have on common sensible ideas; and how those which are made use of to stand for actions and notions quite removed from sense, have their rise from thence, and from obvious sensible ideas are transferred to more abstruse significations, and made to stand for ideas that come not under the cognizance of our senses...
Page 12 - From what hath been premised, it is a manifest consequence that a man born blind, being made to see, would, at first, have no idea of distance by sight ; the sun and stars, the remotest objects as well as the nearer, would all seem to be in his eye, or rather in his mind.
Page 74 - ... were the mildest phrase applied to them in certain quarters. And, most undoubtedly, the terms of the propositions are distinctly materialistic. Nevertheless, two things are certain : the one, that I hold the statements to be substantially true ; the other, that I, individually, am no materialist, but, on the contrary, believe materialism to involve grave philosophical error.
Page 85 - Poet and Prophet differ greatly in our loose modern' notions of them. In some old languages, again, the titles are synonymous ; Votes means both Prophet and Poet : and indeed at all times, Prophet and Poet, well understood, have much kindred of meaning.
Page 37 - Words ultimately derived from such as signify sensible ideas. —It may also lead us a little towards the original of all our notions and knowledge, if we remark how great a dependence our worda have on common sensible ideas ; and how those which are made use of to stand for actions and notions quite removed from sense, have their rise from thence, and from obvious sensible ideas are transferred to more abstruse significations, and made to stand for ideas that come not...

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