Elements of English Composition: A Preparation for Rhetoric

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S.C. Griggs, 1886 - 174 pages
 

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Page 162 - I wind about, and in and out, With here a blossom sailing, And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling, And here and there a foamy flake Upon me, as I travel With many a silvery waterbreak Above the golden gravel, And draw them all along, and flow To join the brimming river; For men may come and men may go, But I go on forever.
Page 162 - The swain responsive as the milkmaid sung, The sober herd that lowed to meet their young, The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school. The watchdog's voice that bayed the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind ; — These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And filled each pause the nightingale had made.
Page 3 - Wedding-Guest! this soul hath been Alone on a wide wide sea: So lonely, 'twas, that God himself Scarce seemed there to be.
Page 161 - I come from haunts of coot and hern, I make a sudden sally And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley.
Page 100 - And stopped at once amid their maddest plunge! Motionless torrents! silent cataracts! Who made you glorious as the Gates of Heaven Beneath the keen full moon? Who bade the sun Clothe you with rainbows? Who, with living flowers Of loveliest blue, spread garlands at your feet? GOD! let the torrents, like a shout of nations, Answer! and let the ice-plains echo, GOD!
Page 88 - And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton, All in a chaise and pair. " My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we.
Page 90 - Until he came unto the Wash Of Edmonton so gay ; And there he threw the Wash about, On both sides of the way, Just like unto a trundling mop, Or a wild goose at play. At Edmonton, his loving wife From the balcony spied Her tender husband, wondering much To see how he did ride. " Stop, stop, John Gilpin ! — Here's the house !' They all at once did cry ; " The dinner waits, and we are tired :" — Said Gilpin—
Page 73 - We may not live to the time, when this Declaration shall be made good. We may die ; die, colonists ; die, slaves ; die, it may be, ignominiously and on the scaffold. Be it so. Be it so. If it be the pleasure of Heaven that my country shall require the poor offering of my life, the victim shall be ready, at the appointed hour of sacrifice, come when that hour may.
Page 75 - I could weep My spirit from mine eyes! There is my dagger, And here my naked breast: within, a heart Dearer than Plutus...
Page 89 - Good lack ! quoth he — yet bring it me, My leathern belt likewise, In which I bear my trusty sword, When I do exercise.

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