Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

THE EDITOR AND HIS FRIENDS.-[APPENDIX.]

The Nos, refer to the Paragraphs.] | Fly spots, to remove

of honour

151
. 206

Camellia, pronunciation of 85
Camera lucida, simple
Camphor balls
Caroline, queen of Geo. II. 190
Chemical experiments. 51, 83
Chestnut trees.
Chicory

Coal dust, to economise
Cockatoos, to keep

China, materials in the

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

57

. 132

115

71

98, 172

15

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

205

Red tapists

Interesting statistics
Invisible ink, to make.
Iron or steel, blueing of, 102,
145, 147.

[ocr errors]

60

19

9

8

91, 15

"Its," remarks on the word 109
"John Bull," origin of . 110
Keeping accounts.
Knights Commanders of the
Bath.
Lavender and peppermint 212
Life, the term of

10

15

157

17

19

[blocks in formation]

27

199

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Sea sickness, receipt for
Shaving in England, origin
of.

9

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

10

114

185

the word

4

London, size of

112

Silkworms

12

Coffee, to make

34

London, birds of

[blocks in formation]

Coins beneath foundation

Lucky and unlucky days

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

Lying, on .

[blocks in formation]

Common ink, to make 104, 146

Macaulay the historian.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Cooking lamps

135

Marine aquaria..

[blocks in formation]

Copper, chemical test for

.58

Marriage in army and navy 28

Slipper working

171

Cossacks

152

Maynooth battery

86

Splitting thin paper.

23

[blocks in formation]

Magic liquor.

103

Stamp for veining leaves

202

Crochet signs (XX) expla-

Meals

11

St. Valentine's day

[ocr errors][merged small]

nation of

[blocks in formation]

Currant gruel

76

Menschikoff's carriage.

137

St. Patrick's day and the
shamrock.

67

Curtains, to preserve from

Mental calculation

[ocr errors]

192

[blocks in formation]

158

"Dole," derivation of

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

the sun

Early rising.

Eggs, weight and value of.
Elastic moulds, to form
English composition, exer-
cises in
Epidemiological Society
Erysipelas, cure for
Etiquette of the newly
married

Eyes, insensibility of, to

Neck wrappers.

1 New offences

New paint, to destroy the
smell of.

136 Timethrift

. 193" Unmarried" females
77 Vaudeville theatre

Milk or cream, to convert

Strawberry, the

65

179

Sunburn, wash for

[blocks in formation]

7

Superfluous hair

201

80" Mrs.," ancient applica-

Talking parrots

162

tion of the word
Muses, (the); why they were
called Pierides.

177

Tender feet, remedy for

128

Thames sports.

124

66

National education, mea.
sures for

The Queen's luncheon
Thunder storms

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

29

216

"Whig" and "Tory," deri-

vation of the words
Wine, how to choose
215 Work by contract.
150 Zoological Gardens

30

25

9

63

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

WARKWORTH CASTLE AND

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

THE origin of this time-worn castle dlou is supposed to date from the eleventh century. It stands about seven miles south-east from Alnwick, and belongs to the Duke of Northum berland. A few particulars of this interesting place were given by the Rev. Mr. Hartshorne, at a meeting of the Archæological Institute 077 at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, about two years since. It appears that, on the forfeiture of Warkworth Castle by the first Earl of Northumber land, it was granted to Roger de Umframville by Henry IV., who reduced it after a siege of eight days. Henry V. restored the for

[ocr errors]

tress to the Percies, after which it underwent frequent forfeitures to the Crown, and came into the power of successive nobles, until the reign of Queen Mary, who, in 1557, restored it, with all the honours and estates appertaining, to Sir Thomas Percy, afterwards Earl of Northumberland, whose descendants have held it without interruption to the present time.

The castle of Warkworth stands on the south side of the river Coquet, and about a mile from its mouth, on a piece of elevated ground. Steep on the west, but on the north and east rising from the river side with a more gentle acclivity On the south side, where the castle-yard is on a level with the adjacent country, the entrance has been defended by a deep ditch, which was crossed by a drawbridge. The barbacan, or gateway tower, on the exterior south wall, was in the olden times defended by a portcullis. Passing through the archway of this tower, in the lower part of which, the person who has charge of the castle resides, the visitor finds himself within the castle-yard. West of the gateway are the remains of a tower in which there were formerly a kitchen, buttery, and other offices. This was called the Lion Tower, from the figure of a lion which still remains over the arch forming the entrance. To the north stands the keep, which is of a square figure, with the angles truncated, having a projecting tower of a semi-octangular form on each of its sides, and surmounted by a lofty exploratory turret. A flight of steps leads to the principal entrance, which is in the southern tower. The lower apartments, of which there are eight, have arched stone roofs, and are dimly lighted by loop-holes. In the floor of one of these apartments is an opening to a gloomy vault, fifteen feet square, supposed to have been used as a place of solitary confinement for prisoners; and as there are no stairs by which a person could descend to this blackhole, the wretched captives who were confined there must have been lowered down by means of ropes, or have descended by means of a ladder. From these apartments one large and two smaller stair

cases lead to the next story, the former terminating in a spacious landing place, round which stone seats are placed. The great hall, which was 39 feet long and 24 feet wide, and about 20 feet high, extending to the roof, is now in a state of dilapidation and roofless.

From the top of Warkworth Castle, a magnificent prospect is obtained of the surrounding country. To the east and north-east there is a sea-view, embracing a wide range of shore, with Dunstanborough and Bambrough Castles at_the most distant point of land. The Farn islands lie scattered like patches on the face of the waters. The port of Alemouth is a nearer object; and at a little distance, the mouth of the river Coquet and Coquet island, with its ruined monastery, are seen. To the north is seen a rich cultivated country to Alnwick: westward, the banks of the Coquet river, graced with little woodlands, which here and there impend on its winding channel; to the south, you view an extensive plain inclining towards the sea, crowded with villages and interspersed with woods; the shore indented by many little ports and creeks, the higher grounds are scattered over with many hamlets, churches, and other buildings, mingling with a variety highly pleasing; whilst in the extreme distance, the different tints of the landscape, arising from various objects, require colours to convey their picture to the mind.

About a mile from the castle is the celebrated HERMITAGE OF WARKWORTH, rendered immortal by the poem of Bishop Percy, a member of the noble family whose name he bore.

The Percy family maintained a chantry priest to reside in the hermitage, and to perform mass in the chapel. By existing records, dated Dec. 3, 1532, the last who held this appointment is understood to have received an annual stipend of twenty marks, with pasture for cattle, a garden, and other perquisites.

The hermitage contains a small chapel hewn out of the rock, eighteen feet long, and about eight feet in width, with a groined roof, resembling the early English style of architecture. The roof rests on semi-hexagonal columns projecting

from the walls. At the east end is an altar at an ascent of two steps. It is lighted by a window at the south end, under which is a recess containing a tomb, with the recumbent figure of a female, at the foot of which is a figure as if in meditation, the head reclining on the right hand, and the other hand placed across the breast. The hermitage contains other apartments, probably of a domestic character, and over these is a garden, to which access is gained by a winding stair cut in the rock. This hermitage is supposed to have been the retreat of one of the Bertram family in the thirteenth century.

It is uncertain at what period the Hermitage was formed, but judging from its appearance, an earlier date cannot be assigned than the reign of Edward II. Bishop Percy states that the memory of the first hermit was held in such regard and veneration by the Percy family, that they had the place preserved with the strictest care, and devoted it to religious purposes.

visible from the upper windows of the hall, where some of the pleasantest families in the county reside.

Here, surrounded by all that can make the days pass calmly and joyously, my old friend Joe Willis and I lived together, quarrelling not with time or weather; and here the years glide gently along by us, or bear us onward with them nearer to that pleasant land of rest to which we look forward without fear or hesitation.

My friend is no ordinary man. To know him you must know all his history, for his character is made up of the experiences of a life of much joy, and not a little sorrow. To look at him as he sits in his easy-chair, you would not fancy his life had been so varied a story; but as you know him you will learn to esteem him for the sacred love with which he treasures the past, and then the wealth of his soul will open to you, and you will grow rich in his memories.

In the month of January, in a year which I will not name, for the years go so fast that I dare not tell you how long ago these things happened, Joe and my

SKETCHES OF THE OLD HALL, self were at our country sporting-box.

ELLEN WILLIS.

THE old Hall stands on the river-bank, in a grove of oaks, the growth of more than a century. The mansion is large, built of stone in the substantial style of fifty years ago, with broad halls, endless suites of rooms, deep windows and large chimneys. The antique appearance of the building is forcibly contrasted with the perfection of modern luxury in the interior arrangements; nor is there a wish that the most fastidious taste will find ungratified, in the various portions of the establishment.

At the foot of the lawn which slopes to the river's edge, is a stone wharf, at which our boat is lying in pleasant weather. The stables are at a convenient distance from the house, and the road is a half mile off, the park grounds stretching away toward it.

About four miles from us is the village and the post-office, while nearer, and at various distances, are old places, mostly

It was late for hunting, and the deer were in poor condition. But there had been very little snow, and now indeed it was all gone. The air had for several days been soft and May-like, and we found it pleasant to trudge over the hills together, singing, laughing, or shouting; and we had almost concluded to winter it at the cabin, and wait for trout-fishing in the spring. One morning, when the sky was uncommonly clear, and the sun almost like June, we left the cabin for a long day's tramping. Our rifles had been carefully cleaned. Somehow we had a fancy that the day's sport would be good. The dogs seemed to feel as we felt. John was a noble fellow. Leo was a large, heavy-chested hound, lithe and active, while he was strong as a lion. They stalked behind us, occasionally looking at one another, and at times lifting their heads so as to look into our eyes, but without even an inquiring look. Their expression seemed to be one of perfect readiness for any emergency. It was nearly noon. We had thrown

« PreviousContinue »