Charles Eliot, Landscape Architect: A Lover of Nature and of His Kind, who Trained Himself for a New Profession, Practised it Happily and Through it Wrought Much Good

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1902 - 770 pages
 

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Page 381 - Experience keeps a dear School, but Fools will learn in no other, and scarce in that; for it is true, we may give Advice, but we cannot give Conduct...
Page 736 - Thou'rt gone, the abyss of heaven Hath swallowed up thy form; yet, on my heart Deeply hath sunk the lesson thou hast given, And shall not soon depart. He who, from zone to zone, Guides through the boundless sky thy certain flight, In the long way that I must tread alone, Will lead my steps aright.
Page 507 - We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths; In feelings, not in figures on a dial. We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives Who thinks most — feels the noblest — acts the best.
Page 1 - It sounds to him like her mother's voice Singing in Paradise : He needs must think of her once more How in the grave she lies, And with his hard rough hand he wipes A tear out of his eyes.
Page 44 - Invention, strictly speaking, is little more than a new combination of those images which have been previously gathered and deposited in the memory ; nothing can come of nothing : he who has laid up no materials, can produce no combinations.
Page 200 - Or helps th' ambitious Hill the heav'ns to scale, Or scoops in circling theatres the Vale, Calls in the Country, catches opening glades, Joins willing woods, and varies shades from shades, Now breaks, or now directs, th' intending Lines; Paints as you plant, and, as you work, designs.
Page 352 - Readers of poetry see the factoryvillage and the railway, and fancy that the poetry of the landscape is broken up by these; for these works of art are not yet consecrated in their reading; but the poet sees them fall within the great Order not less than the beehive or the spider's geometrical web. Nature adopts them very fast into her vital circles, and the gliding train of cars she loves like her own.
Page 70 - Let our artists rather be those who are gifted to discern the true nature of the beautiful and graceful : then will our youth dwell in a land of health, amid fair sights and sounds, and receive the good in everything; and beauty, the effluence of fair works, shall flow into the eye and ear, like a healthgiving breeze from a purer region, and insensibly draw the soul from earliest years into likeness and sympathy with the beauty of reason.
Page 25 - The mathematics, and the metaphysics, Fall to them, as you find your stomach serves you: No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en ; — In brief, sir, study what you most affect.
Page 218 - Laying out grounds, as it is called, may be considered as a liberal art, in some sort like poetry and painting : and its object, like that of all the liberal arts, is, or ought to be, to move the affections under the control of good sense...

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