Thomas Hobbes and the Politics of Natural Philosophy

Front Cover
A&C Black, 2004 M06 4 - 208 pages
In 1625, Charles I inherited not only his father's crown, but also his desire to run the country without interference from Parliament. But many members of Parliament opposed the King on issues of taxation, religion and the royal prerogative. It was in this historical context that Hobbes presented a political philosophy that, at least in his opinion, achieved the status of a science, in a nation that was 'boiling hot with questions concerning the rights of dominion and the obedience due from subjects'. In this important new book, Stephen J. Finn argues that, contrary to the traditional interpretation, Hobbes's political views influence his theoretical and natural philosophy and not the other way about. Such an interpretation, it is argued, provides a better appreciation of Hobbes's writings, both philosophical and political.
 

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Contents

1 Background and Goals
1
2 The Traditional Interpretation of Influence
31
3 Hobbess Political Agenda
66
4 The Politics of the Philosophy of Mind
99
5 The Politics of Language and Truth
124
6 The Politics of Nominalism
150
7 The Politics of Reason
167
Bibliography
182
Index
189
Copyright

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About the author (2004)


Stephen J. Finn is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Assistant Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at the United States Military Academy, West Point, USA.

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