The Chicago Medical Journal, Volume 25

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James Barnet, 1868
 

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Page 280 - If the man who makes two blades .of grass to grow where one grew before...
Page 359 - It were good therefore that men in their innovations would follow the example of time itself, which indeed innovateth greatly, but quietly and by degrees scarce to be perceived...
Page 331 - THERAPEUTICS AND MATERIA MEDICA; a Systematic Treatise on the Action and Uses of Medicinal Agents, including their Description and History.
Page 408 - The larger works usually recommended as text-books in our Medical schools are too voluminous for convenient use. This will be found to contain, in a condensed form, all that is most valuable, and will supply students with a reliable guide to the course of lectures on Materia Medica as delivered at the various Medical schools in the United States.
Page 408 - CONTRIBUTIONS RELATING TO THE CAUSATION AND PREVENTION OF DISEASE, AND TO CAMP DISEASES; TOGETHER WITH A REPORT OF THE DISEASES, ETC., AMONG THE PRISONERS AT ANDERSONVILLE, GA.
Page 578 - Each essay must be designated by a device or motto, and must be accompanied by a sealed envelope, bearing the same device or motto, and containing the name and address of the author. The envelope belonging to the successful essay will be opened, and the name of the author announced, at the Annual Commencement of the College, in March, 1879.
Page 579 - JC Dalton, MD, Professor of Physiology in the College of Physicians and Surgeons; Alexander B.
Page 194 - I firmly believe that if the whole materia medica, as now used, could be sunk to the bottom of the sea, it would be all the better for mankind, — and all the worse for the fishes.
Page 669 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands ; But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him And makes me poor indeed.
Page 688 - ... the diathesis. This is done naturally, and is to be imitated artificially, by the elimination of the morbid element through the channels of augmented excretions, such as the sweat, the urine, and the secretions of the alimentary canal. You will perceive, then, that my argument may be thus summed up.

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