Walks in Rome

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 2005 M11 1 - 360 pages
The external charm of the Coliseum has recently been spoilt by the cutting down of all the trees and destruction of the beautiful pomegranate gardens on the lower slope of the Esquiline, and the erection in their place of the most hideous and gigantic houses... -from Walks in Rome English aristocrat Augustus J.C. Hare filled his days with trips to the Continent, and returned home to share his journeys with eager readers-and the journals of his travels still enjoy a cultishly devoted readership today. His Walks in Rome was first published in 1871; this replica of the 15th edition, from 1900, offers a virtual walking tour of: . the Corso and its neighborhood, including the Piazza del Popolo, the Temple of Neptune, and the Fountain of Trevia . the Forums and the Coliseum, including the Temple of Mars, the House of the Vestals, and the Arch of Constantine . the Palatine, including the Palace of Caligula and the House of Hortensius . and much more. Charmingly enthusiastic and obsessively detailed, this guidebook continues to be invaluable for today's travelers, and for those fascinated by the ongoing metamorphosis of a modern metropolis. Also available from Cosimo Classics: Hare's Sketches in Holland and Scandinavia. British travel writer Augustus John Culbert Hare (1834-1903) also wrote Epitaphs for Country Churchyards (1856) and Wanderings in Spain (1873).
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTORY
1
CHAPTER I
17
CHAPTER II
24
The Capitolinb
72
CHAPTER IV
108
CHAPTER V
161
CHAPTER VI
192
The Coblian
222
CHAPTER VIII
243
CHAPTER IX
260
CHAPTER X
302
INDEX
331
Copyright

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Page 3 - HILDA'S TOWER WHEN we have once known Rome, and left her where she lies, like a longdecaying corpse, retaining a trace of the noble shape it was, but with accumulated dust and a fungous growth overspreading all its more admirable features...
Page 4 - Rome ! my country ! city of the soul ! The orphans of the heart must turn to thee, Lone mother of dead empires ! and control In their shut breasts their petty misery. What are our woes and sufferance ? Come and see The cypress, hear the owl, and plod your way O'er steps of broken thrones and temples, Ye ! Whose agonies are evils of a day — A world is at our feet as fragile as our clay. The Niobe of nations ! there she stands, Childless and crownless, in her voiceless woe ; An empty urn within her...
Page 4 - ... when we have left Rome in such mood as this, we are astonished by the discovery, by and by, that our heartstrings have mysteriously attached themselves to the Eternal City, and are drawing us thitherward again, as if it were more familiar, more intimately our home, than even the spot where we were born.

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