Abstracts of Papers Read Before the Society: Together with the Annual Report

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Page 18 - All men plume themselves on the improvement of society, and no man improves. Society never advances. It recedes as fast on one side as it gains on the other. It undergoes continual changes : it is barbarous, it is civilized, it is christianized, it is rich, it is scientific ; but this change is not amelioration. For everything that is given, something is taken.
Page 12 - Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new : That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do...
Page 11 - She crieth at the gates, at the entry of the city, at the coming in at the doors: "Unto you, O men, I call; and my voice is to the sons of man.
Page 18 - Zealander, whose property is a club, a spear, a mat, and an undivided twentieth of a shed to sleep under ! But compare the health of the two men, and you shall see that the white man has lost his aboriginal strength.
Page 22 - At 9^30 he came into the drawing-room for his letters — rejoicing if the post was a light one and being sometimes much worried if it was not. He would then hear any family letters read aloud as he lay on the sofa. The reading aloud, which also included part of a novel, lasted till about half-past ten, when he went back to work till twelve or a quarter past. By this time he considered his day's work over, and would often say, in a satisfied voice, "I've done a good day's work.
Page 26 - There is every reason to consider it established, that an earthquake is simply " the transit of a wave or waves of elastic compression in any direction, from vertically upwards to horizontally in any azimuth, through the crust and surface of the earth, from any centre of impulse or from more than one, and which may be attended with sound and tidal waves, dependent upon the impulse and upon circumstances of position as to sea and land.
Page 12 - ... mercantile people, you know well that in the achievements of science there is not only beauty and wonder, but also beneficence and power. It is not only that she has revealed to us infinite space crowded with unnumbered worlds ; infinite time peopled by unnumbered existences ; infinite organisms hitherto invisible, but full of delicate and iridescent loveliness; but also that she has been a great archangel of mercy, devoting herself to the service of man.
Page 16 - In place of ruthless self-assertion it demands self-restraint; in place of thrusting aside or treading down all competitors, it requires that the individual shall not merely respect but shall help his fellows; its influence is directed, not so much to the survival of the fittest, as to the fitting of as many as possible to survive.
Page 58 - It has been said that he who makes two blades of grass grow where only one grew before is a benefactor to his species.
Page 6 - Hence we may look with some confidence to a secure future of great length. And as natural selection works solely by and for the good of each being, all corporeal and mental endowments will tend to progress towards perfection.

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