Stories and Tales from the Animal World

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Educational Publishing Company, 1901 - 243 pages
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Page 63 - The mountain and the squirrel Had a quarrel, And the former called the latter 'Little Prig; Bun replied, 'You are doubtless very big; But all sorts of things and weather Must be taken in together, To make up a year And a sphere. And I think it no disgrace To occupy my place. If I'm not so large as you, You are not so small as I, And not half so spry. I'll not deny you make A very pretty squirrel track; Talents differ; all is well and wisely put...
Page 112 - When on earth they fade and perish, Blossom in that heaven above us.' When he heard the owls at mid-night, Hooting, laughing in the forest, 'What is that?' he cried in terror; 'What is that?' he said, 'Nokomis?' And the good Nokomis answered: 'That is but the owl and owlet, Talking in their native language, Talking, scolding at each other.
Page 216 - And ere three shrill notes the pipe uttered, You heard as if an army muttered: And the muttering grew to a grumbling; And the grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling, And out of the houses the rats came tumbling. Great rats, small rats, lean rats, brawny rats, Brown rats, black rats, gray rats, tawny rats, Grave old plodders, gay young friskers, Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins, Cocking tails and pricking whiskers, Families by tens and dozens, Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives— Followed the Piper...
Page 52 - Forth into the forest straightway All alone walked Hiawatha Proudly, with his bow and arrows; And the birds sang round him, o'er him? "Do not shoot us, Hiawatha!
Page 112 - Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How they built their nests in Summer, Where they hid themselves in Winter, Talked with them whene'er he met them, Called them "Hiawatha's Chickens." Of all beasts he learned the language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How the beavers built their lodges, Where the squirrels hid their acorns, How the reindeer ran so swiftly, Why the rabbit was so timid, Talked with them whene'er he met...
Page 215 - And as for what your brain bewilders, If I can rid your town of rats Will you give me a thousand guilders?
Page 199 - H, pages 26 and 27. 1. SAID a hare to a +tortoise, " Good sir, what a while You have been, only +crossing the way; Why, I really believe, that to go half a mile, You must travel two nights and a day.
Page 218 - And, like fowls in a farmyard when barley is scattering, Out came the children running. All the little boys and girls, With rosy cheeks and flaxen curls And sparkling eyes and teeth like pearls, Tripping and skipping, ran merrily after The wonderful music with shouting and laughter.
Page 213 - And licked the soup from the cooks' own ladles, Split open the kegs of salted sprats, Made nests inside men's Sunday hats, And even spoiled the women's chats By drowning their speaking With shrieking and squeaking In fifty different sharps and flats. At last the people in a body To the Town Hall came flocking: "'Tis clear...
Page 200 - We will run half a mile in a race." ? "Very good," said the hare; said the tortoise, " Proceed, And the fox shall decide who has won." Then the hare started off with incredible speed, But the tortoise walked leisurely on. *' Come, tortoise, friend tortoise, walk on...

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