The House of Lords in the XVIIIth Century

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Clarendon Press, 1927 - 556 pages

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Page 445 - I thank your Ladyship for the information concerning the Methodist preachers; their doctrines are most repulsive, and strongly tinctured with impertinence and disrespect towards their superiors, in perpetually endeavouring to level all ranks, and do away with all distinctions. It is monstrous to be told, that you have a heart as sinful as the common wretches that crawl on the earth. This is highly offensive and insulting; and I cannot but wonder that your Ladyship should relish any sentiments so...
Page 224 - That in case the Crown and imperial dignity of this Realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this Kingdom of England this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the Crown of England without the consent of Parliament.
Page 271 - I was particularly attentive to the choice of my words, to the harmony and roundness of my periods, to my elocution, to my action. This succeeded, and ever will succeed ; they thought I informed, because I pleased them : and many of them said, that I had made the whole very clear to them ; when, God knows, I had not even attempted it.
Page 271 - Lord Macclesfield, who had the greatest share in forming the bill, and who is one of the greatest mathematicians and astronomers in Europe, spoke afterwards with infinite knowledge, and all the clearness that so intricate a matter would admit of: but as his words, his periods, and his utterance were not near so good as mine, the preference was most unanimously, though most unjustly, given to me.
Page 456 - That it is a high infringement of the liberties and privileges of the Commons of the United Kingdom...
Page 138 - Peers shall be summoned in the same Manner and have the same Powers and Privileges at such Trial as any other Peers of Great Britain...
Page 139 - Scotland and their successors to their honours and dignities shall from and after the union be peers of Great Britain, and have rank and precedency next and immediately after the peers of the like orders and degrees in England at the time of the union...
Page 15 - Commons also being very impatient to enter), gave order for the opening of the door; upon which they all rushed in, pushed aside their competitors, and placed themselves in the front rows of the gallery. They stayed there till after eleven, when the House rose; and during the debate gave applause, and showed marks of dislike, not only by smiles and winks (which have always been allowed in these cases), but by noisy laughs and apparent contempts; which is supposed the true reason why poor Lord Hervey...
Page 139 - Ireland shall, as peers of the united kingdom, be sued and tried as peers, except as aforesaid, and shall enjoy all privileges of peers as fully as the peers of Great Britain; the right and privilege of sitting in the house of lords, and the privileges depending thereon, and the right of sitting on the trial of peers, only excepted...
Page 197 - Now high, now low, now master up, now miss, And he himself one vile antithesis. Amphibious thing ! that acting either part, The trifling head, or the corrupted heart ; Fop at the toilet, flatterer at the board, Now trips a lady, and now struts a lord.

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