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CANADA

The Debates of the Senate

THE SENATE.

OFFICIAL REPORT

Monday, March 18, 1918.

The Senate met at 10.30 a.m., the Speaker in the Chair.

Prayers.

OPENING OF THE SESSION.

The Hon. the SPEAKER informed the Senate that he had received a communication from the Governor General's Secretary informing him that the Right Honourable Sir Charles Fitzpatrick, G.C.M.G., Chief Justice of Canada, Deputy Governor General, would proceed to the Senate Chamber to open the session of the Dominion Parliament on Monday, the 18th of March, at 11 o'clock; and a further communication from the Governor General's Secretary informing him that His Excellency the Governor General would proceed to the Senate Chamber to open formally the session of the Dominion Parliament on Monday, the 18th March, at 3 o'clock.

NEW SENATORS INTRODUCED. The following newly appointed Senators were severally introduced and took their seats:

Hon. Frederick Lawrence Schaffner, B.A., M.D., C.M., of Boissevain, Manitoba, introduced by Hon. Sir James Lougheed and Hon. Mr. McMeans.

Hon. George Henry Bradbury, of Selkirk, Manitoba, introduced by Hon. Sir James Lougheed and Hon. Mr. Sharpe.

Hon. William James Harmer, of Edmonton, Alberta, introduced by Hon. Sir James Lougheed and Hon. Mr. Robertson.

1 Hon. Edward Michener, of Red Deer, Alberta, introduced by Hon. Sir James Lougheed and Hon. Mr. Robertson.

Hon. Irving R. Todd, of Milltown, New Brunswick, introduced by Hon. Sir James Lougheed and Hon. Mr. Thompson.

Hon. John Webster, of Brockville, Ontario, introduced by Hon. Sir James Lougheed and Hon. Mr. Taylor.

The Senate adjourned during pleasure. After some time the sitting was resumed.

The Right Honourable Sir Charles Fitzpatrick, G.C.M.G., Chief Justice of Canada, Deputy Governor General, having come and being seated,

The Hon. the SPEAKER commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to proceed to the House of Commons and acquaint the House that: It is the Right Honourable the Deputy Governor General's desire that they attend him immediately in the Senate."

Who being come,

The Hon. the SPEAKER said: Honourable Gentlemen of the Senate:

Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

I have it in command from the Right Honourable the Deputy Governor General to let you know that His Excellency the Governor General does not see fit to declare the cause of his summoning the present parliament until the Speaker of the House of Commons shall have been chosen according to law; but to-day, at the hour of three o'clock in the afternoon, His Excellency will declare the causes of his calling this parliament.

The Right Honourable the Deputy Governor General was pleased to retire, and the House of Commons withdrew.

The Senate adjourned till 2.30 this after

noon.

The Senate met at 2.30 p.m., the Speaker in the Chair, and immediately thereafter adjourned during pleasure.

THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.

At three o'clock His Excellency the Governor General proceeded to the Senate Chamber and took his seat upon the Throne. The members of the Senate being

REVISED EDITION

assembled, His Excellency was pleased to command the attendance of the House of Commons, and that House being come, His Excellency was pleased to open the First Session of the Thirteenth Parliament of the Dominion of Canada with the following Speech:

Honourable Gentlemen of the Senate,

Gentlemen of the House of Commons.

You have been summoned to the first session of a new Parliament in the midst of a worldwide struggle which vitally concerns the liberties, the institutions, and the destiny of our country, and of the whole world. Thus the responsibilities and duties imposed upon you are even graver and more far reaching than in the ordinary course of public affairs. Bearing with you a new mandate from the people, and animated by the unfaltering spirit which has inspired them during the long and anxious years of effort and sacrifice, I am confident that you will bring to the discharge of your public duties, an unflinching resolve to sustain the high cause in which our country has already borne so splendid a part.

After nearly four years of war the issue still remains undecided. The effort which yet lies before us demands our sternest resolve, but we shall not shrink from it if our hearts are as firm and our courage as undaunted as those of our countrymen who hold our battle line beyond the seas. The Canadian Expeditionary Force still sustains its unbroken record of distinguished achievement to which it has notably contributed since the close of the last session.

Notwithstanding a greater delay than was anticipated in the operation of the Military Service Act, the necessary reinforcements to keep our forces at full strength have been provided and this purpose will be maintained in the future.

In order to extend the principle of the present Civil Service Act to the Outside Service, and thus to provide that all appointments to the Public Service shall be made upon the sole standard of merit, further enabling legislation will be necessary. meantime, the principle thus adopted has been carried into effect, as far as possible, by an Order in Council which will be placed before you.

In the

My advisers are impressed with the necessity of a strong and progressive policy of immigration and colonization, accompanied by suitable provisions to induce settlement upon the land, to encourage increased agricultural production and to aid in the development of agricultural resources. In pursuance of this purpose, the Ministry of Immigration and Colonization has been established by Order in Council, and necessary legislation to confirm this action will be laid before you.

In connection with the demobilization of our Forces, my advisers recognize the urgent necessity of provision for the care and vocational training of returned soldiers. Organized effort to provide such training, to assist them in obtaining employment and to aid in establishing them in the activities of civil life is not only important but essential. A department of the Government for this purpose has been constituted and has been invested with necessary powers and

duties.

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A Bill for extending the franchise to women, with suitable provisions respecting naturalization, will be submitted and commended to your consideration.

Your attention will also be invited to a Bill to consolidate and amend the Acts relating to railways, a Bill relating to Daylight Saving; Bills relating to taxation of war profits and of incomes, and other measures.

In order to insure the fullest co-operation with the Government of the United States and to assist in securing the most effective utilization of the resources of both countries for war purposes, a Canadian War Mission has been established at Washington, and a War Trade Board has been constituted at Ottawa.

In view of the need for conserving to the fullest extent all national resources during the war and in furtherance of provincial enactments, action has been taken under the War Measures Act, 1914, to prohibit the importation and manufacture of intoxicating beverages and to forbid the transportation thereof into any community where their sale is contrary to law.

My advisers having reached the conclusion that a complete registration of the manhood and womanhood of Canada above the age of sixteen years is not only important but essential under present conditions, the necessary authority has been provided under the War Measures Act, 1914.

The Orders in Council embodying the foregoing provisions will be laid before you.

The appalling disaster at Halifax resulting in the loss of many hundred lives, and the destruction of a considerable portion of the city, and of the adjacent town of Dartmouth, has evoked universal sympathy for those who have suffered. My advisers will submit to you proposals for relieving the distress and loss thus occasioned.

Notwithstanding the critical and trying conditions through which the country has passed during the last three years, the commercial, industrial and financial stability of Canada, has been well maintained. The volume of foreign trade greatly exceeds that attained during any corresponding period in previous years and the favourable balance of trade has also vastly increased.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

The accounts for the last and the estimates for the next fiscal year will be submitted to you without delay and you will be asked to make the necessary financial provision for the effective conduct of the war.

Honourable Gentlemen of the Senate,

Gentlemen of the House of Commons.

Notwithstanding disappointments in the Eastern theatre of war, there is no reason to doubt the ultimate triumph of our cause. The effort of the nations included within the British Commonwealth is still unabated and

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