EMERSON AS A POET

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Page 34 - The hand that rounded Peter's dome And groined the aisles of Christian Rome Wrought in a sad sincerity; Himself from God he could not free; He builded better than he knew; The conscious stone to beauty grew.
Page 66 - Spreading its leafless blooms in a damp nook, To please the desert and the sluggish brook. The purple petals, fallen in the pool, Made the black water with their beauty gay ; Here might the red-bird come his plumes to cool, And court the flower that cheapens his array.
Page 35 - O'er England's abbeys bends the sky, As on its friends, with kindred eye ; For out of Thought's interior sphere These wonders rose to upper air...
Page 26 - Merlin's mighty line Extremes of nature reconciled, Bereaved a tyrant of his will, And made the lion mild. Songs can the tempest still, Scattered on the stormy air, Mould the year to fair increase. And bring in poetic peace. He shall not seek to weave, In weak, unhappy times, Efficacious rhymes ; Wait his returning strength. Bird that from the nadir's floor To the zenith's top can soar, — The soaring orbit of the muse exceeds that journey's length.
Page 13 - Thin, thin the pleasant human noises grow, And faint the city gleams; Rare the lone pastoral huts — marvel not thou! The solemn peaks but to the stars are known, But to the stars, and the cold lunar beams; Alone the sun arises, and alone Spring the great streams.
Page 40 - I HUNG my verses in the wind, Time and tide their faults may find. All were winnowed through and through, Five lines lasted sound and true ; Five were smelted in a pot Than the South more fierce and hot ; These the siroc could not melt, Fire their fiercer flaming felt, And the meaning was more white Than July's meridian light. Sunshine cannot bleach the snow, Nor time unmake what poets know. Have you eyes to find the five Which five hundred did survive ? SOLUTION.
Page 37 - Boughs on which the wild bees settle, Tints that spot the violet's petal, Why Nature loves the number five, And why the star-form she repeats...
Page 87 - His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was, lest he should make an end.
Page 87 - Yet there happened in my time one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered.
Page 79 - Who'll tell me my secret, The ages have kept? — I awaited the seer While they slumbered and slept...

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