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" His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was, lest he should... "
EMERSON AS A POET - Page 87
by JOEL BENTON - 1883
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The Port folio, by Oliver Oldschool

...he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more prestly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness...from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry or pleased at his devotion. The fear of every one that heard him was, lest...
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The Port Folio

1813
...he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more prestly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness...from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry or pleased at his devotion. The fear of every one that heard him was, lest...
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The Port Folio

1801
...prestly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness. less idleness in what he uttered. No mem* her of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His...from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry or pleased at his devotion. The fear of every one that heard him was, lest...
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The Works of Ben Jonson...: With Notes Critical and Explanatory ..., Volume 9

Ben Jonson, William Gifford - 1816
...he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, morepressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness,...from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power....
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The essays; or, Counsels moral, economical, and political, by sir F. Bacon

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1818
...suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of the own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside...from him without loss. He commanded, where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power....
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The Essays Or Counsels, Moral, Economical and Political: With Elegant ...

Francis Bacon - 1818 - 290 pages
...suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech bat consisted of the own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside...from him without loss. He commanded, where he spoke; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power....
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Relics of Literature

Reuben Percy - 1823 - 400 pages
...language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man more neatly, more priestly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness,...from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and made his judges angry and pleased, at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power....
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 16

Francis Bacon - 1834
...suffered less emptiness, less idleness in what he uttered: no member of his speech but consisted of its own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss : he commanded when he spoke, and had his judges angry and (a) See note DD at the end. (6) See note EE at the end....
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 7

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1827
...speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly,...from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power....
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1827
...speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly,...from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power....
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