Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson: With Annotations, Volume 5

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Houghton Mifflin, 1911
 

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Page 237 - We are students of words : we are shut up in schools, and colleges, and recitation-rooms, for ten or fifteen years, and come out at last with a bag of wind, a memory of words, and do not know a thing. We cannot use our hands, or our legs, or our eyes, or our arms.
Page 210 - These varieties are lost sight of at a little distance, at a little height of thought. One tendency unites them all. The voyage of the best ship is a zigzag line of a hundred tacks. See the line from a sufficient distance, and it straightens itself to the average tendency.
Page 406 - The sincerity and marrow of the man reaches to his sentences. I know not anywhere the book that seems less written. It is the language of conversation transferred to a book. Cut these words and they would bleed ; they are vascular and alive.
Page 57 - Ashpenaz, the master of his eunuchs, that he should bring certain of the children of Israel and of the king's seed, and of the princes; 4 Children in whom was no blemish, but well favoured, and skilful in all wisdom, and cunning in knowledge, and understanding science, and such as had ability in them to stand in the king's palace, and whom they might teach the learning and the tongue of the Chaldeans.
Page 170 - Do that which is assigned you, and you cannot hope too much or dare too much. There is at this moment for you an utterance brave and grand as that of the colossal chisel of Phidias, or trowel of the Egyptians, or the pen of Moses, or Dante, but different from all these.
Page 6 - Trust in the LORD with all thine heart, and lean not to thine own understanding; In all thy ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct thy paths.
Page 26 - One impulse from a vernal wood May teach you more of man, Of moral evil and of good Than all the sages can.
Page 459 - I do not wish to remove from my present prison to a prison a little larger. I wish to break all prisons. I have not yet conquered my own house. It irks and repents me. Shall I raise the siege of this hencoop, and march baffled away to a pretended siege of Babylon?
Page 204 - More safe I sing with mortal voice, unchanged To hoarse or mute, though fallen on evil days, On evil days though fallen, and evil tongues...
Page 353 - 1 poema sacro al quale ha posto mano e cielo e terra, sì che m'ha fatto per più anni macro, vinca la crudeltà che fuor mi serra del bello ovile ov'io dormi...

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