The Isle of Wight visitor's book

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Page 79 - Within a long recess there lies a bay : An island shades it from the rolling sea, And forms a port secure for ships to ride : Broke by the jutting land on either side, ^ In double streams the briny waters glide...
Page 53 - Forgive, blest shade, the tributary tear, That mourns thy exit from a world like this ; Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here, And stayed thy progress to the seats of bliss • No more confined to grov'ling scenes of night, No more a tenant pent in mortal clay, Now should we rather hail thy glorious flight, And trace thy journey to the realms of day.
Page 96 - indeed, it is matter of surprise to me, after having fully examined this favoured spot, that the advantages it possesses in so eminent a degree, in point of shelter and exposition, should have been so long overlooked in a country like this, whose inhabitants, during the last century, have been traversing half the globe in search of climate.
Page 24 - Its soil is a gravel, which, assisted with its declivity, preserves it always so dry, that immediately after the most violent rain a fine lady may walk without wetting her silken shoes. The fertility of the place is apparent from its extraordinary verdure, and it is so shaded with large and flourishing elms...
Page 24 - ... declivity, preserves it always so dry that immediately after the most violent rain a fine lady may walk without wetting her silken shoes. The fertility of the place is apparent from its extraordinary verdure, and it is so shaded with large and flourishing elms, that its narrow lanes are a natural grove or walk, which, in the regularity of its plantation, vies with the power of art, and in its wanton exuberancy greatly exceeds it...
Page 16 - ... another court of singular construction, a relic of the feudal times — the Curia Militum, or Knight's Court, instituted by William Fitzosborne, first Lord of the Island ; and so called from being originally composed of persons holding a Knight's fee, who decided, without the intervention of a jury, on all actions of debt and trespass under the value of forty shillings. Their jurisdiction comprised the whole island, except the borough of Newport, The steward of the governor, or his deputy, presides...
Page 96 - ... have been so long overlooked in a country like this, whose inhabitants during the last century have been traversing half the globe in search of climate. The physical structure of this singular district has been carefully investigated and described by the geologist, and the beauties of its scenery have been often dwelt upon by the tourist; but its far more important qualities as a winter residence for the delicate invalid seem scarcely to have attracted attention, even from the medical philosopher....

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