Dickinson and the Boundaries of Feminist Theory

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University of Illinois Press, 1991 - 179 pages
Poetry written by the gifted recluse Emily Dickinson has remained fresh and enigmatic for longer than works by her male Transcendentalist counterparts. Here Mary Loeffelholz reads Dickinson's poetry and career in the double context of nineteenth-century literary tradition and twentieth-century feminist literary theory.

"Mary Loeffelholz has written a book that actually performs what it promises. . . . It illuminates our understanding of Emily Dickinson with readings both elegant and useful, and as importantly suggests modified direction for feminist-psychoanalytic theory."
-- Diana Hume George, author of Oedipus Anne: The Poetry of Anne Sexton
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
My Fathers Business Errands into Nature and Tales of the Caskets
7
Love after Death Dickinsons Higher Criticism and the Law of the Father
47
Violence and the Others of Identity Dickinson and the Imaginary of Womens Literary Tradition
81
An Ear outside the Castle
116
All we are strangers dear Elegy and Unknowning
152
Index
175
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